tick


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Related to tick: deer tick, Lyme disease, tick bite

tick all the (right) boxes

To satisfy or fulfill everything that is necessary or desired. Primarily heard in UK. Of course, a prospective employee may tick all the right boxes on paper but might not be suited to the job once they're actually working for you. His newest thriller ticks all the boxes the author's fans will be hoping for.
See also: all, box, tick

tick over

1. Of an engine, to run at an idle pace in neutral while the vehicle is not moving. Primarily heard in UK. I won't stay any longer, as I've left the car ticking over outside.
2. To continue operating steadily but uneventfully. Primarily heard in UK. A: "How are things lately, Jeff?" B: "Just ticking over, can't complain really." They decided to leave one person in charge to make sure business ticked over during the long break.
3. To record or be recorded, as on a clock or other mechanical counting device. The Irish squad will be glad to see the first half tick over, as they'll need to regroup if they want to beat this Italian team. The taxi's meter had just ticked over £35 when we pulled into Heathrow Airport.
See also: tick

go on tick

To purchase something on credit. "Tick" is short for "ticket," a note that showed one's debt (although this practice is less common today). Primarily heard in UK. I had to go on tick for a bunch of last-minute purchases because I've already spent so much on this trip! Well, if you need groceries and won't get paid for another week, just go on tick.
See also: on, tick

*full as a tick

very full of food or drink. (Alludes to a tick that has filled itself full of blood. See also tight as a tick. *Also: as ~.) Little Billy ate and ate until he was as full as a tick. Our cat drank the cream until he became full as a tick.
See also: full, tick

make someone or something tick

Fig. to cause someone or something to run or function. (Usually with what. Tick refers to a watch or clock.) I don't know what makes it tick. What makes John tick? I just don't understand him. I took apart the radio to find out what made it tick.
See also: make, tick

tick away

[for seconds or minutes] to go by as the clock ticks. The seconds ticked away as the fateful time got closer. As time ticked away, the surgeons worked feverishly to repair the walls of Roger's heart.
See also: away, tick

tick someone off

to make someone angry. That really ticks me off! Doesn't that tick off everyone?
See also: off, tick

ticked (off)

angry. Wow, was she ticked off! Kelly was totally ticked.
See also: tick

*tight as a tick

 
1. very tight. (Fig. on the image of a tick swollen tight with blood or of a tick stuck tightly in someone's skin. *Also: as ~.) This lid is screwed on tight as a tick. The windows were closed—tight as a tick—to keep the cold out.
2. intoxicated. (Fig. on full as a tick. *Also: as ~.) The old man was tight as a tick but still lucid. The host got tight as a tick and fell in the pool.
3. [of a race] close, as if the racers are moving very closely together. (*Also: as ~.) This election is as tight as a tick.
4. very friendly and close; as thick as thieves. (*Also: as ~.) Those two are tight as a tick. They are always together.
See also: tick, tight

what makes someone tick

Fig. something that motivates someone; something that makes someone behave in a certain way. (Fig. on what makes something tick.) William is sort of strange. I don't know what makes him tick. When you get to know people, you find out what makes them tick.
See also: make, tick

what makes something tick

Fig. the sense or mechanism that makes something run or function. (With reference to the ticking of a clock representing the functioning of the clock.) I don't know what makes it tick. I took apart the radio to find out what made it tick.
See also: make, tick

what makes somebody tick

the reasons why someone behaves the way they do The admiral was interested in people, what made them tick and what influenced their behavior.
See also: make, tick

tick off something

also tick something off
to name a list of things She ticked off six reasons for saying no. She had lots of objections, and she ticked them off one after another.
See also: off, tick

tick somebody off

(spoken) also tick off somebody
to make someone angry It just ticks me off to think that anyone who wants to can read my e-mail. It was only a suggestion, not a criticism, and she didn't think it would tick off everyone at the meeting.
See also: off, tick

be as full as a boot/tick

  (Australian informal)
to be very drunk Old Clive was as full as a boot when he left the hotel last night.
See also: boot, full

what makes somebody tick

if you know what makes someone tick, you understand the reasons for their behaviour and personality A good salesperson knows what makes a customer tick.
See also: make, tick

tick off

Infuriate, make angry. For example, That article ticked me off. [Colloquial; second half of 1900s] For a vulgar synonym, see piss off.
See also: off, tick

tight as a tick

Drunk, as in She was tight as a tick after just one glass of wine. This expression alludes to a tick engorged with the blood of the animals it feeds on. [Slang; mid-1800s]
See also: tick, tight

what makes one tick

What makes one function characteristically, what motivates one, as in We've never figured out what makes these chess players tick. This expression alludes to tick in the sense of "function as an operating mechanism, such as a clock." [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
See also: make, one, tick

tick away

v.
1. To function characteristically or well: That old car is still ticking away.
2. To be gradually depleted. Used of an interval of time: The final seconds ticked away.
See also: away, tick

tick by

v.
To pass. Used of time: As the minutes ticked by, we became worried that we would miss the train.
See also: tick

tick off

v.
1. To make someone angry or annoyed: Constant delays ticked me off. The arrogant actor ticked off the director.
2. To mark some item on a list with a check or tick: The teacher ticked off each name as the roll was called. As the guests arrived, we ticked them off the list.
See also: off, tick

tick over

v.
1. To be recorded on some mechanical counting device: When the second quarter of the game ticked over, the home team was leading by two points.
2. To record something. Used of a mechanical counting device: The clock ticked over the ninetieth minute, and the game ended in a tie. As the car's odometer ticked the fifth mile over, we began looking for the turn.
3. To function characteristically or well. Used chiefly in the progressive: Because everyone works hard, the business is really ticking over.
See also: tick

(as) tight as a tick

1. mod. very tight. The windows were closed—tight as a tick—to keep the cold out.
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. (An elaboration of tight.) The host got tight as a tick and fell in the pool.
See also: tick, tight

tight as a tick

verb
See also: tick, tight

a few ticks

n. a few minutes; a few seconds. Just wait. I’ll be there in a few ticks.
See also: few, tick

tick

n. a minute; a second. (see also sec.) This won’t take a tick. Sit tight.

tick someone off

tv. to make someone angry. (see also ticked (off).) That really ticks me off!
See also: off, tick

ticked (off)

mod. angry. Kelly was so ticked!
See also: off, tick

ticked

verb
See also: tick

tick-tock

(ˈtɪktɑk)
1. n. a heart. (see also ticker.) My tick-tock is as strong as an ox’s.
2. n. a watch or clock. (Juvenile.) Wind your tick-tock before you forget.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lone star tick is "the most common human-biting tick in the southeastern U.
Adult ticks live for up to 200 days before finding a host on which to feed.
If any ticks are found, they will be removed and placed in a labelled tube.
If you find a tick and are concerned, consider bringing your dog to the vets where it can be removed safely.
This method allows for the collection of both the tick for testing for pathogens, as well as blood and tissue from the deer.
Ticks live off the blood of birds and mammals and love warm, humid weather.
Early in July, an article in the New England Journal of Medicine described another new tick disease contracted from a bacterium that is a close relative to that causing Lyme disease.
According to Telford, an adult tick sucks about 1 to 11/2 milliliters of blood during each meal.
There are more sheep kept in the area than used to be the case and as ticks prefer sheep to cattle skin that too has probably impacted on their numbers.
The UK harbours more than 20 species of this relative of the spider, but it is the sheep tick that poses the biggest risk to humans.
Appendix 2 (46 pages) lists the host of invasive ticks by taxonomic class (of host), scientific name of host and common name when known, and the scientific name of the tick taken from the host.
BACKGROUND: Northward expansion of the tick Ixodes scapularis is driving Lyme disease (LD) emergence in Canada.