thunder

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Related to thundering: Thundering herd

(as) black as thunder

Full of rage or hostility, likened to the black clouds that accompany thunderstorms. When I looked up, his face was as black as thunder, and I knew that I was in trouble.
See also: black, thunder

son of thunder

A speaker who attracts listeners by using an impassioned, often aggressive, delivery. The phrase originated in the Bible. I can't listen to that son of thunder bluster about his idiotic worldview anymore. A son of thunder has everyone mesmerized in the town square right now.
See also: of, son, thunder

blood and thunder

A spoken piece or performance that is loud and impassioned. I don't think you'll fall asleep during this play—I hear it's all blood and thunder.
See also: and, blood, thunder

risk of rain

 and risk of showers; risk of thunder(-storms)
a chance of precipitation. (Used only in weather forecasting. There is no "risk" of hazard or injury involved.) And for tomorrow, there is a slight risk of showers in the morning. There is a 50 percent risk of rain tonight.
See also: of, rain, risk

steal someone's thunder

Fig. to lessen someone's force or authority. What do you mean by coming in here and stealing my thunder? I'm in charge here! someone stole my thunder by leaking my announcement to the press.
See also: steal, thunder

thunder across something

Fig. to move across something, making a rumbling sound. The jets thundered across the sky, heading for their home base. As the race car thundered across the track, people strained to get a better view.
See also: across, thunder

thunder past someone or something

Fig. to move past someone or something, rumbling. As the traffic thundered past, I wondered why there was so much of it. The train thundered past the sleeping town.
See also: past, thunder

thunder something out

Fig. to respond with words spoken in a voice like thunder. He thundered the words out so everyone could hear them. He thundered out the words.
See also: out, thunder

blood and thunder

a speech or performance that is loud and full of emotion, especially anger We sat through 2 hours of blood and thunder and came out feeling exhausted.
See also: and, blood, thunder

steal somebody's thunder

to do something that takes attention away from what someone else has done
Usage notes: In the 17th century the writer John Dennis built a machine which made sounds like thunder for one of his plays, but the idea was copied by someone else and used in another play.
I kept quiet about my pregnancy because Cathy was getting married, and I didn't want to steal her thunder.
See also: steal, thunder

have a face like thunder

  also look like thunder
to have a very angry expression I don't know what had happened but he had a face like thunder. She didn't say anything but she looked like thunder.
See steal thunder
See also: face, have, like, thunder

steal someone's thunder

Use or appropriate another's idea, especially to one's advantage, as in It was Harold's idea but they stole his thunder and turned it into a massive advertising campaign without giving him credit . This idiom comes from an actual incident in which playwright and critic John Dennis (1657-1734) devised a "thunder machine" (by rattling a sheet of tin backstage) for his play, Appius and Virginia (1709), and a few days later discovered the same device being used in a performance of Macbeth, whereupon he declared, "They steal my thunder."
See also: steal, thunder

thunder

thunder-boomer

n. a thunderstorm. There will be thunder-boomers in the boonies tonight.

thunder-thighs

n. big or fat thighs. (Cruel. Also a rude term of address.) Here, thunder-thighs, let me get you a chair or two.

steal (someone's) thunder

To use, appropriate, or preempt the use of another's idea, especially to one's own advantage and without consent by the originator.
See also: steal, thunder
References in classic literature ?
If you had put forward a thundering revolutionary manifesto, not a daily paper would have dared allude to it: there is no cowardice like Fleet Street cowardice
The captain had been struck dead by thundering apoplexy.
The noise and thundering grew louder and louder, until the floor began to open, whereupon Hadvor made them take the caldron of pitch and pour plenty of it into the opening.
So saying he put the tankard to his lips, when a thundering rap sounded upon the door-panel, making it to quiver, and causing Tuck almost to drop his tankard; while an angry voice shouted, "Ho
The carriage rolled with a thundering noise over the pavement, and every one turned to notice the dazzling meteor.
When, however, he got within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up against the rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrific roar.