thrown


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Related to thrown: thrown away, thrown off, thrown out

be thrown in the deep end

To be prompted or forced to begin doing something very complex and/or unfamiliar, especially suddenly and without guidance, assistance, or preparation. I had never worked in sales before, I was just thrown in the deep end! We were thrown into the deep end the first day of class when the lecturer asked us to write a 2,000-word essay on one of Shakespeare's plays. Those who go the furthest in life are the ones willing to be thrown in at the deep end when a great opportunity arises.
See also: deep, end, thrown

throw (something) into question

To cause something to be doubted, scrutinized, or a matter for serious discussion. These series of protests have thrown into question the ability of this government to remain in power. This reluctance to act is bound to throw your leadership skills into question.
See also: question, throw

throw a scare into (someone)

To unsettle, startle, or shock someone; to instill someone with fear or disquietude. Though heavily favored to lose the election, the Republican candidate's late surge in the polls is sure to have thrown a scare into the incumbent president's camp.
See also: scare, throw

throw a sickie

To tell one's employer, truthfully or otherwise, that one is ill and unable to attend work. Primarily heard in UK. I'm going to have work the morning after my birthday party. Something tells me I'll be throwing a sickie that day!
See also: throw

throw a wobbly

To suddenly become very upset or intensely angry and make a big display of it. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. John threw a wobbly at work after the boss criticized his report. Needless to say, he won't be welcome back in the office on Monday.
See also: throw, wobbly

throw discretion to the wind(s)

To act or behave recklessly and/or fearlessly, with no sense of restraint or propriety. (An older variant of the now more common "throw caution to the wind(s).") After my father won a bit of money at the race tracks, he began throwing discretion to the winds and ended up gambling away everything we had. You can't live life completely reserved, you know—you've got to throw discretion to the wind every now and then.
See also: discretion, throw

throw chunks

To vomit, especially violently or in great quantity. Everyone bought John so many drinks on his 21st birthday that he was throwing chunks before midnight. I felt like I was going to throw chunks from seasickness out on that boat.
See also: chunk, throw

throw (someone) off the trail

To misdirect someone away from their point of pursuit; to steer someone's investigation or suspicions in the wrong direction. The mafia accountant had been throwing the authorities off the trail of the mob's money laundering for years. My husband has some suspicions about our affair, but the trip I'm taking for work will throw him off the trail.
See also: off, throw, trail

throw (one's) toys out of the pram

To behave in a petulantly upset or angry manner; to act like an angry child. Primarily heard in UK. Manchester United's star striker threw his toys out of the pram after he was ejected from the match for biting another player.
See also: of, out, pram, throw, toy

throw (one's) weight about

To assert oneself in a controlling, domineering, or authoritarian manner; to exercise one's position of authority, power, or influence, especially to an overbearing or excessive degree. (A variant of the more common "throw one's weight around.") An effective leader should inspire enough confidence in their team that they don't have to throw their weight about to get things done. I'm sick of Donald coming into these meetings and throwing his weight about. Can't he just leave us to our own devices?
See also: throw, weight

throw (some) shapes

slang To dance, especially to popular music. Primarily heard in UK. If I've had a couple of drinks and the music is good, I can't help but throw some shapes on the dance floor. The flash mob started throwing shapes in the train station to classic 1970s disco tunes.
See also: shape, throw

be thrown off balance

1. To be made unsteady, such that one may fall. I was thrown off balance on my roller skates when that dog rushed by me and knocked into my legs.
2. To be confused, upset, or taken aback (by something). I was rather thrown off balance when Jenny said she wanted to have a baby.
See also: balance, off, thrown

throw a wobbler

To suddenly become very upset or intensely angry and make a big display of it. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. John threw a wobbler at work after the boss criticized his report. Needless to say, he won't be coming back in on Monday.
See also: throw, wobbler

throw caution to the wind(s)

To abandon one's cautiousness in order to take a risk. You can't live life completely reserved, you know. You've got to throw caution to the wind every now and then. After my father won a bit of money at the race tracks, he began throwing caution to the winds and gambling everything we had there.
See also: caution, throw

throw (one) off the scent

To misdirect one away from their pursuit; to steer one's investigation or suspicions in the wrong direction. The mafia accountant managed to throw the authorities off the scent of the mob's money laundering for years, but they finally caught up with him after an anonymous source tipped them off. That outlier data threw me off the scent for a while, but I think my research is back on track now.
See also: off, scent, throw

throw (one) off the track

To misdirect one away from their pursuit; to steer one's investigation or suspicions in the wrong direction. The mafia accountant managed to throw the authorities off the track of the mob's money laundering for years, but they finally caught up with him after an anonymous source tipped them off. That outlier data threw me off the track for a while, but I think my research is back on solid ground now.
See also: off, throw, track

throw (someone or something) on the scrap heap

To completely discard someone or something that is unwanted, especially in an unceremonious way. The phrase implies that the thing being discarded is worthless, completely irredeemable, or not worth fixing. The entire design is in danger of getting thrown on the scrap heap if we can't solve the overheating issue. Fred's worked here for 30 years and they just throw him on the scrap heap like that? That ain't right.
See also: heap, on, scrap, throw

throw a (monkey) wrench in(to) the works

To disrupt, foil, or cause problems to a plan, activity, or project. We had everything in line for the party, but having the caterer cancel on us at the last minute really threw a wrench in the works! It'll really throw a monkey wrench into the works if the board decides not to increase our funding for this project.
See also: throw, work, wrench

throw open (something) to (someone or something)

To provide access to something to a particular person, group, etc. Often used in the passive. We plan to throw open the position to applicants as early as next week. The formerly private club was thrown open to the general public after the management change.
See also: open, throw

throw a wobbly

or

throw a wobbler

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone throws a wobbly or throws a wobbler, they lose their temper and get very angry, usually about something unimportant. I can't even mention the problem to Peter because I know he'll just throw a wobbly. I'm sure a lot of other girls of her age would have thrown a wobbler about it and made a big fuss, but not Catherine.
See also: throw, wobbly

throw a wobbly

have a fit of temper or panic. British informal
2000 Sunday Business Post The scene in which Dustin Hoffman's autistic character throws a wobbly in the airport had never quite left me.
See also: throw, wobbly

jump in/be thrown in at the ˈdeep end

(informal) try to do something difficult without help when you are not prepared or know very little about it: On the first day of her new teaching job, she was thrown in at the deep end and was told to teach the most badly-behaved class.I didn’t know anything about business when I started. I just had to jump in at the deep end.
This phrase refers to the deep end of a swimming pool, where it is too deep to stand.
See also: deep, end, jump, thrown
References in periodicals archive ?
Purpose: To teach the receivers to open their hips and turn their body toward a ball thrown behind them.
Actually, the slider rotation should resemble the spiraling action of a football or bullet, but the ball must be thrown from the top (not the side) to ensure velocity.
Palmer has thrown for 3,639 yards and 32 touchdowns this season.
This will be flatter than the slider that is thrown down at the hitter's back foot.
About the ball that was thrown from the upper deck and nearly hit him, Appier said: ``I hope they weren't gunning for me.
For all the innings, both in the major leagues and the minors, Andrew Lorraine has thrown in his pro baseball existence, lessons are always to be learned.
Teaches the athlete the importance of focusing on the delivery rather than actual distance thrown.
Each presses a button on a keypad to chart jabs thrown and connected, power punches thrown and connected and overall punches thrown and connected.
Golden rule: It's better to have the wrong pitch thrown with confidence than the right pitch thrown with doubt.
It was the first time he has thrown more than two innings this spring, but the shot off his knee could hamper his work in the next few days, potentially muddling the equation further.
He's used to throwing his way into shape in spring training, and he's going to come into spring training having thrown far more than he's ever thrown in the past.
Earlier in the half, after fans had thrown pizza on the court - ``I think it was Canadian bacon,'' said UCLA coach Steve Lavin - fans were warned that if anything else were thrown on the court, it would result in a technical foul against ASU (10-6, 3-4).
Paus has helped the Bruins to a 4-0 start, hasn't thrown an interception in 154 consecutive attempts dating back to last season and has the 19th best passing-efficiency rating in the nation.