thing

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thing

n. one’s interest; one’s bag. This isn’t exactly my thing, but I’ll give it a try.
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References in classic literature ?
Let Marmee think we are getting things for ourselves, and then surprise her.
For an hour the procession of grotesques passed before the eyes of the old man, and then, although it was a painful thing to do, he crept out of bed and began to write.
I admit they do sometimes come too close to be pleasant, but we don't run away; we are used to it, and understand it, and if we never had blinkers put on we should never want them; we should see what was there, and know what was what, and be much less frightened than by only seeing bits of things that we can't understand.
It was the fore-and-aft gear that was broken--the thing that leads aft from the forward part of the horse and is made fast to the thing that pulls the wagon.
You make them a witch pie; that's the thing for YOU to do.
It was the first time Mary had heard of them, either, but even at this stage she had begun to realize that, queer as he was, Colin had read about a great many singular things and was somehow a very convincing sort of boy.
Write out on a sheet of notepaper what you want and my servant will take a cab and bring the things back to you.
You might just as well say,' added the March Hare, `that "I like what I get" is the same thing as "I get what I like"
But as you know things present, here are my two reals, and tell me, most excellent sir ape, what is my wife Teresa Panza doing now, and what is she diverting herself with?
But somehow the things drift back again: the stubborn beast-flesh grows day by day back again.
Things that sound contradictory should be examined by the same rules as in dialectical refutation whether the same thing is meant, in the same relation, and in the same sense.
But there are other things which a man is afraid to tell even to himself, and every decent man has a number of such things stored away in his mind.
Let us take ourselves out of the way, and leave things for the present to take their course.
But these are not quantitative, but relative; things are not great or small absolutely, they are so called rather as the result of an act of comparison.
The chief advantage that would result from the establishment of Socialism is, undoubtedly, the fact that Socialism would relieve us from that sordid necessity of living for others which, in the present condition of things, presses so hardly upon almost everybody.