thing


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thing

n. one’s interest; one’s bag. This isn’t exactly my thing, but I’ll give it a try.
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References in classic literature ?
It's naughty to fret, but I do think washing dishes and keeping things tidy is the worst work in the world.
That in the beginning when the world was young there were a great many thoughts but no such thing as a truth.
Of course it is," said he; "to my mind, fashion is one of the wickedest things in the world.
All our friends in Lucerne had said that to look down upon Meiringen, and the rushing blue-gray river Aar, and the broad level green valley; and across at the mighty Alpine precipices that rise straight up to the clouds out of that valley; and up at the microscopic chalets perched upon the dizzy eaves of those precipices and winking dimly and fitfully through the drifting veil of vapor; and still up and up, at the superb Oltschiback and the other beautiful cascades that leap from those rugged heights, robed in powdery spray, ruffled with foam, and girdled with rainbows--to look upon these things, they say, was to look upon the last possibility of the sublime and the enchanting.
You make them a witch pie; that's the thing for YOU to do.
I've heard Jem Fettleworth's wife say th' same thing over thousands o' times--callin' Jem a drunken brute," said Ben Weatherstaff dryly.
What you have got to do is to destroy the thing that is upstairs-- to destroy it so that not a vestige of it will be left.
It IS the same thing with you,' said the Hatter, and here the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn't much.
See, here are my two reals," and he bade Sancho give them to Master Pedro; but he answered for the ape and said, "Senor, this animal does not give any answer or information touching things that are to come; of things past he knows something, and more or less of things present.
The only thing that could excuse vivisection to me would be some application--"
Critics, he says, jump at certain groundless conclusions; they pass adverse judgment and then proceed to reason on it; and, assuming that the poet has said whatever they happen to think, find fault if a thing is inconsistent with their own fancy.
I will tell you another thing that would be better, and that is, if I myself believed in anything of what I have just written.
And that is the very thing that alarms me," returned Dantes.
For it happens at times that the same thing is both small and great.
It was, undoubtedly, the Abolitionists who set the torch alight, who began the whole thing.