thick and fast


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thick and fast

in large numbers or amounts and at a rapid rate. The enemy soldiers came thick and fast. New problems seem to come thick and fast.
See also: and, fast, thick

thick and fast

Rapidly crowding, coming so fast they run together, as in The questions came at him thick and fast. This term originated in the second half of the 1500s as thick and threefold and was replaced by the current version about 1700. For a synonym, see fast and furious.
See also: and, fast, thick
References in classic literature ?
MY DEAR HOLMES: If I was compelled to leave you without much news during the early days of my mission you must acknowledge that I am making up for lost time, and that events are now crowding thick and fast upon us.
He withdraws his hand and falls to looking at the sleet and snow again until they seem, by being long looked at, to fall so thick and fast that he is obliged to close his eyes for a minute on the giddy whirl of white flakes and icy blots.
Then up and down and back and forth they trod, the blows falling so thick and fast that, at a distance, one would have thought that half a score of men were fighting.
It was about this time that the warnings of coming events began to fall about us thick and fast.
From Heaven and from Olympus he came forthwith, hurling his lightning: the bold flew thick and fast from his strong hand together with thunder and lightning, whirling an awesome flame.
Four other Oysters followed them, And yet another four; And thick and fast they came at last, And more, and more, and more-- All hopping through the frothy waves, And scrambling to the shore.