thee


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Related to thee: three

company manners

Exceptional manners; those that are preferred or required in and among polite society. One must at all times exhibit company manners if one is to make a good impression among the more influential members of society.
See also: company, manner

to a fare-thee-well

1. To a state or condition of utmost perfection or completion. Her new house is absolutely gorgeous! They've designed it to a fare-thee-well.
2. To the greatest or furthest degree possible. After the economy crashed, the government began whittling down social welfare to a fare-thee-well. The home team trounced their opponents, beating them to a fare-thee-well.

claw me, claw thee

Help me, and I'll help you. A phrase used to describe a reciprocal relationship. After how much you helped me with the budget, of course I'll work with you to finish the project! Claw me, claw thee!
See also: claw, thee

fare thee well

The highest degree; perfection. Wow, you really played that part to a fare thee well—I'm so impressed!
See also: fare, thee, well

get thee behind me

A phrase used to rebuke temptation. The full Biblical phrase is "Get thee behind me, Satan." You know I'm on a diet, and you're offering me ice cream? Get thee behind me!
See also: behind, get, thee

ka me, ka thee

Help me, and I'll help you. The phrase is likely Scottish in origin. If you drive me to work today, I'll buy you pizza this weekend. Ka me, ka thee, right?
See also: ka, thee

company manners

One's best behavior, as in George never interrupts when we have guests; he has fine company manners. This term employs company in the sense of "guests." An older variant, Tell me thy company and I'll tell thee thy manners, uses company in the sense of "companions." The current term implies that one is more mindful of politeness with invited guests.
See also: company, manner

to a fare-thee-well

To the most extreme degree, especially a condition of perfection. For example, We've cleaned the house to a fare-thee-well, or He played the part of martyr to a fare-thee-well. This term first appeared as to a fare-you-well in the late 1800s, and the more archaic-sounding present form replaced it about 1940.

to a fare-thee-well

to perfection; thoroughly. US
This expression is of late 18th-century American origin, and is also found in the form to a fare-you-well .
1911 R. D. Saunders Colonel Todhunter The fight's begun, and we've got to rally around old Bill Strickland to a fare-you-well.
References in classic literature ?
Rachel now took down a snowy moulding-board, and, tying on an apron, proceeded quietly to making up some biscuits, first saying to Mary,--"Mary, hadn't thee better tell John to get a chicken ready?
John can come in here to his meals, if thee needs to stay all day," suggested Rachel.
Deal uprightly with us, Isaac will paying this ransom of a thousand crowns leave thee altogether penniless?
Well go to what though there be,'' said the Outlaw, ``we will not reckon with thee too closely.
Tell me, Anselmo, if Heaven or good fortune had made thee master and lawful owner of a diamond of the finest quality, with the excellence and purity of which all the lapidaries that had seen it had been satisfied, saying with one voice and common consent that in purity, quality, and fineness, it was all that a stone of the kind could possibly be, thou thyself too being of the same belief, as knowing nothing to the contrary, would it be reasonable in thee to desire to take that diamond and place it between an anvil and a hammer, and by mere force of blows and strength of arm try if it were as hard and as fine as they said?
All that I have said to thee so far, Anselmo, has had reference to what concerns thee; now it is right that I should say something of what regards myself; and if I be prolix, pardon me, for the labyrinth into which thou hast entered and from which thou wouldst have me extricate thee makes it necessary.
I know thee dost things as nobody else 'ud do, my lad.
At last he called for a light and a draught of water (beer was a thing only to be drunk on holidays), and Lisbeth ventured to say as she took it in, "Thy supper stan's ready for thee, when thee lik'st.
I shall see thee again, I think, many times,' and he cantered off down the road.
I tell thee, holy man, Thy raiments and thy ebony cross affright me
Baldazzar, it doth grieve me To give thee cause for grief, my honoured friend.
I care not who thou art," answered the bold Tanner, "and unless thou hast many more of thy kind by thee, thou canst never make Arthur a Bland cry `A mercy.
Now, by my faith, thou saucy rogue, thy tongue hath led thee into a pit thou wilt have a sorry time getting out of; for I will give thee such a drubbing as ne'er hast thou had in all thy life before.
FAUSTUS GIVES TO THEE HIS SOUL: O, there it stay'd!
Exhausted I see thee, by poisonous flies; bleeding I see thee, and torn at a hundred spots; and thy pride will not even upbraid.