thee


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Related to thee: three

company manners

Exceptional manners; those that are preferred or required in and among polite society. One must at all times exhibit company manners if one is to make a good impression among the more influential members of society.
See also: company, manner

to a fare-thee-well

1. To a state or condition of utmost perfection or completion. Her new house is absolutely gorgeous! They've designed it to a fare-thee-well.
2. To the greatest or furthest degree possible. After the economy crashed, the government began whittling down social welfare to a fare-thee-well. The home team trounced their opponents, beating them to a fare-thee-well.

claw me, claw thee

Help me, and I'll help you. A phrase used to describe a reciprocal relationship. After how much you helped me with the budget, of course I'll work with you to finish the project! Claw me, claw thee!
See also: claw, thee

fare thee well

The highest degree; perfection. Wow, you really played that part to a fare thee well—I'm so impressed!
See also: fare, thee, well

get thee behind me

A phrase used to rebuke temptation. The full Biblical phrase is "Get thee behind me, Satan." You know I'm on a diet, and you're offering me ice cream? Get thee behind me!
See also: behind, get, thee

ka me, ka thee

Help me, and I'll help you. The phrase is likely Scottish in origin. If you drive me to work today, I'll buy you pizza this weekend. Ka me, ka thee, right?
See also: ka, thee

company manners

One's best behavior, as in George never interrupts when we have guests; he has fine company manners. This term employs company in the sense of "guests." An older variant, Tell me thy company and I'll tell thee thy manners, uses company in the sense of "companions." The current term implies that one is more mindful of politeness with invited guests.
See also: company, manner

to a fare-thee-well

To the most extreme degree, especially a condition of perfection. For example, We've cleaned the house to a fare-thee-well, or He played the part of martyr to a fare-thee-well. This term first appeared as to a fare-you-well in the late 1800s, and the more archaic-sounding present form replaced it about 1940.

to a fare-thee-well

to perfection; thoroughly. US
This expression is of late 18th-century American origin, and is also found in the form to a fare-you-well .
1911 R. D. Saunders Colonel Todhunter The fight's begun, and we've got to rally around old Bill Strickland to a fare-you-well.
References in classic literature ?
I might have known thee by that pretty maiden air of thine--that dainty, finicking manner of gait.
Verily, some eight or ten years ago I left thee a stripling lad, with great joints and ill-hung limbs, and lo
Yea," said young Gamwell, "and I did so look up to thee, and thought thee so above all other men that, I make my vow, had I known who thou wert, I would never have dared to lift hand against thee this day.
They think much about thee with their circumscribed souls--thou art always suspected by them
In thy presence they feel themselves small, and their baseness gleameth and gloweth against thee in invisible vengeance.
Yea, my friend, the bad conscience art thou of thy neighbours; for they are unworthy of thee.
John can come in here to his meals, if thee needs to stay all day," suggested Rachel.
Thank thee, Rachel; will see, tomorrow; but, here comes Simeon.
I know thee dost things as nobody else 'ud do, my lad.
At last he called for a light and a draught of water (beer was a thing only to be drunk on holidays), and Lisbeth ventured to say as she took it in, "Thy supper stan's ready for thee, when thee lik'st.
Give not thy soul to dreams: the camp -- the court, Befit thee -- Fame awaits thee -- Glory calls -- And her the trumpet-tongued thou wilt not hear In hearkening to imaginary sounds And phantom voices.
We have been boys together -- schoolfellows -- And now are friends -- yet shall not be so long -- For in the eternal city thou shalt do me A kind and gentle office, and a Power -- A Power august, benignant and supreme -- Shall then absolve thee of all further duties Unto thy friend.
Well, well, I forgive thee, provided thou dost mend and not show thyself in future so fond of thine own interest, but try to be of good cheer and take heart, and encourage thyself to look forward to the fulfillment of my promises, which, by being delayed, does not become impossible.
This said, he formd thee, ADAM, thee O Man Dust of the ground, and in thy nostrils breath'd The breath of Life; in his own Image hee Created thee, in the Image of God Express, and thou becam'st a living Soul.
And thy request think now fulfill'd, that ask'd How first this World and face of things began, And what before thy memorie was don From the beginning, that posteritie Informd by thee might know; if else thou seekst Aught, not surpassing human measure, say.