the rats


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the rats

n. the delirium tremens. The way he was shaking, I knew he had the rats.
See also: rat
References in classic literature ?
I've lost my dear son Thomas; I'm afraid the rats have got him.
Presently the rats came back and set to work to make him into a dumpling.
Naturally, the cats that performed with the rats were too cowed for this.
The cat and the rat have been enemies since the world began.
They shall learn kindness early, to the dog, the cat, yes, even the rat, and the pretty linnet in its cage.
Well, the woman fell to talking about how hard times was, and how poor they had to live, and how the rats was as free as if they owned the place, and so forth and so on, and then I got easy again.
The creatures had crept downwards with the subsidence of the rick till they were all together at the bottom, and being now uncovered from their last refuge they ran across the open ground in all directions, a loud shriek from the by-this-time half-tipsy Marian informing her companions that one of the rats had invaded her person--a terror which the rest of the women had guarded against by various schemes of skirt-tucking and self-elevation.
As for the rats, I left the killing of them to the cook and the other servants, just as I should have left any other part of the domestic business to the cook and the other servants.
Then there is the story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, how first he piped the rats away, and afterward, when the mayor broke faith with him, drew all the children along with him and went into the mountain.
The rats are most mischievous by their gnawing everything; and I have heard unfortunate tulip-growers complain most bitterly of Noah for having put a couple of rats in the ark.
And, moreover," Van Baerle, having become mistrustful in his captivity, continued, "there is an animal much more to be feared than even the cat or the rat.
Before, so as not to scare the rats in front of him, he had turned his dark lantern on himself, lighting up his own head; now, to hasten their flight, he lit the dark space in front of him.
People," said the rat, "always speak of it with a sneer--as though it were something dis- graceful.
The rat charged him then and striking the creature away with his hand the man rose and backed off, searching for something with which to strike a harder blow.
Presently one of them, a little, mean-faced, black-bearded fellow with a countenance which reminded Tarzan of Pamba, the rat, laid his hand upon the shoulder of a giant who stood next him, and with whom all the others had been arguing and quarreling.