the old school tie

the old school tie

A bond of kinship between people who graduated from the same private school and help each other in the business world. The old school tie is still very influential in the firm, with the majority of upper management coming from the same university.
See also: old, school, tie

the old school tie

BRITISH
The old school tie is the way in which men who have been to the most famous British private schools use their positions of power to help improve the careers of other men who went to the same school. Networking is a major part of male culture — whether through the old school tie, the pub, the club or the sports field. Note: You can use the old school tie before a noun. So does the old school tie network still exist?
See also: old, school, tie

the old school tie

the attitudes of group loyalty and traditionalism associated with wearing the tie of a particular public school. British
See also: old, school, tie

the ˌold school ˈtie

(British English) an informal system in which upper class men educated at the same private school help each other with jobs, contracts, etc. in their adult lives: People say that the bank is run on the old school tie system.
See also: old, school, tie

old school tie

A social or business network of graduates of a secondary school, college, or university in which the members help each other because of their common bond. Among the sartorial details of the Harry Potter movies were the distinctive striped neckties that represented each house. The ties echoed those worn by students at real-life British boarding schools and universities and at American prep schools and colleges. Many alumni continue to sport the neckwear for the rest of their lives to show their academic heritage and to allow themselves to be recognized by fellow graduates. Small wonder, then, that this feeling of pride and sense of community makes these alumni kindly disposed to their colleagues, willing if not eager to help them find employment or membership and to gain advancement. In that sense, “tie” refers both to the cravat and to the interpersonal relationship. A similar expression, “old boy network,” comes from the British expression for a graduate of certain upper-crust boarding schools: As a graduate of Eton, James Bond was an Eton old boy.
See also: old, school, tie