the gate


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the gate

n. a forced exit; sending (someone) away. (see also give someone the gate.) I could see in his eyes that it was the gate for me.
See also: gate
References in classic literature ?
Mavra Kuzminichna opened the gate and an officer of eighteen, with the round face of a Rostov, entered the yard.
Relocking the gate the two strolled arm in arm to the little bower which was their trysting place.
Meanwhile, standing on the other side of the gate, he calmly put the key in his pocket.
A hundred yards to my right was the gate from which the troops were evidently expected to issue, but to reach it I must pass the flank of the green warriors within easy sight of them, and, fearing that my plan to warn the Kaolians might thus be thwarted, I decided upon hastening toward the left, where another gate a mile away would give me ingress to the city.
PETER was most dreadfully frightened; he rushed all over the garden, for he had forgotten the way back to the gate.
Like a bitterly angry croaking ran the sound through the long corridors when the leaves of the gate opened: ungraciously did this bird cry, unwillingly was it awakened.
Cautiously opening the gate the fellow peered carefully along the wall upon the outside in the direction from which he had come.
Then the boy got off and gave him a hard thrashing, and knocked him about the head; then he got up again and tried to make him leap the gate, kicking him all the time shamefully, but still the pony refused.
There was a bell beside the gate, and Dorothy pushed the button and heard a silvery tinkle sound within.
It was only now, with the day drawing to a close and with them approaching the gate of the road to Berkeley, that he had broached the important subject.
You are all dressed as are the people of this wicked city so perhaps we may pass unnoticed, but at the gate it will be a different matter, for none is permitted to leave the city at night.
But, there was no loud irruption into the courtyard, as he had expected, and he heard the gate clash again, and all was quiet.
From the Hump we can see the gate that is called after Miss Mabel Grey, the Fig I promised to tell you about.
And though she looked dubiously at the house-front as if inclined to return, it was with a breath of relied that she closed the gate.
The Farmer, beginning to be alarmed for his own safety, opened the gate and released the Lion.