the die is cast


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the die is cast

A course of action has been finalized. This expression comes from a Latin phrase thought to have been said by Julius Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon river and became embroiled in civil war in 49 BCE. Well, the die is cast now that we've closed on the house—we're officially homeowners!
See also: cast, die

die is cast

Prov. A process is past the point of no return. (The die is one of a pair of dice. The cast means thrown. This phrase [in Latin] was said by Julius Caesar when he crossed the Rubicon with his legions, starting a civil war.) After that speech favoring reform of the education system, the die is cast. This is now a campaign issue. The die is cast. There is no turning back on this point.
See also: cast, die

the die is cast

If the die is cast, a decision has been made or something has happened that makes it impossible to change things. The die was cast and it was too late for any regrets. She was now Mrs Arthur Bradley, and would stay that way for life. His reassurance that parliament would debate and express its views before the die is cast was welcome. Note: `Die' is an old singular form of the word `dice'. Once you have thrown the dice, you cannot do anything to change the way they fall. The first use of the expression is attributed to Julius Caesar, who is believed to have said it before crossing over the river Rubicon into Italy from Gaul, thus invading his own country and starting a civil war. `Cross the Rubicon' is based on the same incident.
See also: cast, die

the die is cast

an event has happened or a decision has been taken that cannot be changed.
This expression has its origins in Julius Caesar's remark as he was about to cross the Rubicon, as reported by the Roman historian Suetonius: jacta alea esto ‘let the die be cast’.
See also: cast, die

the die is ˈcast

(saying) a decision has been made, or a risk has been taken, and the situation cannot now be changed: Once he’d signed the papers, he knew the die had been cast and there was no turning back. This phrase is associated with Julius Caesar who was reported to have said this when he took his army across the river Rubicon (see the note at cross the Rubicon). It’s basic meaning is ‘the dice has been thrown’.
See also: cast, die

the die is cast

The decision has been made and is irrevocable.
See also: cast, die

the die is cast

No turning back; past the point of no return. In 49 BC, Julius Caesar led his troops across the Rubicon, a river in northern Italy, in violation of Roman law. As he acted on his decision, he was said to have reflected, Alea iacta est (also alea jacta est), Latin: for “the die has been cast.” He referred to the singular of dice, proving that life was a crap shoot even back then.
See also: cast, die