the conventional wisdom

the conventional wisdom

Common knowledge that is held to be true, but may not be. The conventional wisdom says to feed a cold and starve a fever, but that doesn't reflect current medical practice.
See also: conventional, wisdom

conventional wisdom

A widely held belief on which most people act. For example, According to conventional wisdom, an incumbent nearly always wins more votes than a new candidate . This term was invented by John Kenneth Galbraith, who used it in The Affluent Society (1958) to describe economic ideas that are familiar, predictable, and therefore accepted by the general public. Today it is used in any context where public opinion has considerable influence on the course of events.
See also: conventional, wisdom
References in periodicals archive ?
I like to repeat (and abide by) a mantra: The conventional wisdom in politics is always wrong.
Politics is consequential, and the banter about it - the conventional wisdom - actually matters.
Challenging the conventional wisdom on the property tax.
Perhaps lawmakers will see that the value of defined benefit plan relief trumps the conventional wisdom.
This is the second volume in Cuthbert's challenging assault on the conventional wisdom on urban design and the physical determinism that still shapes most designers' approaches to the subject.
Daring to defy the conventional wisdom that globalization is placing the primary downward pressure on American wages, Globalization And The Politics Of Pay, Hansen's comprehensive analysis presents evidence that free-market ideologies, low voter turnout, and choices made directly by America's states through their laws and policies have had a greater effect on keeping wages low than globalization; furthermore, foreign trade and investment can lead to higher pay in the state labor market.
Challenging such issues as the conventional wisdom that globalization can be blamed for the decline in earnings, Globalization And The Politics Of Pay offers a logical, concise grasp of how American political decisions have effected economic growth and demographics.
and the conventional wisdom posited that straight men just don't care about shopping--at least not enough to sustain a magazine whose content was simply the presentation of products for purchase,
But a recent study from the National Bureau of Economic Research questions the conventional wisdom that competition from immigrants invariably hurts native workers.
The conventional wisdom the title refers to is hardly conventional.
The presidential commission investigating intelligence failures leading to the Iraq war wrote the following in its final report, released in March: "[I]t is hard to deny the conclusion that intelligence analysts worked in an environment that did not encourage skepticism about the conventional wisdom.
Perhaps learning the conventional wisdom and going with your best judgment is just as effective, as well as easier and cheaper.
While there are some interesting Arkansas riffs, the conventional wisdom goes, the presidency is treated as a slap-dash schedule dump--we bounce from bill signing to foreign summit with no real coherence.
Contrary to the conventional wisdom that says unity equals strength, the impact of scores of individual CEO voices proactively speaking out carries more weight than any institutional pleadings.
The conventional wisdom, repeated ad nauseam, says that this government spending should be stopped, as it has done nothing to help a post-bubble recovery.