a busman's holiday

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a busman's holiday

slang A vacation in which one does an activity that is similar to one's job (as in the case of a bus driver, or "busman," who drives on his vacation). Because I'm a docent, visiting museums on vacation is like a busman's holiday for me.
See also: holiday

busman's holiday

A vacation that is spent engaging in an activity that is similar to what one does for work. As a museum curator, Leonard had a busman's holiday when he went to Paris to visit the Louvre.
See also: holiday

busman's holiday

Free time spent in much the same pursuit as one's work. For example, Weather permitting, the lifeguard spent all her days off at the beach-a real busman's holiday . The term alludes to a bus driver spending his day off taking a long bus ride. [Late 1800s]
See also: holiday

a busman's holiday

mainly BRITISH
If someone spends part of their holiday doing things they do in their normal job, you can say that they are having a busman's holiday. This is probably the best fish restaurant in the country — at least one admiring chef a week passes through the cheery dining room on a busman's holiday. A fire crew's Christmas outing turned into a busman's holiday when their coach caught fire. Note: This expression may refer to bus drivers at the beginning of the 20th century when buses were horse-drawn. Drivers sometimes spent their day off riding on their own bus to make sure that the relief drivers were treating the horses properly.
See also: holiday

a busman's holiday

a holiday or form of recreation that involves doing the same thing that you do at work.
From the late 19th century, a popular form of working-class recreation was to take an excursion by bus.
See also: holiday

a busman’s ˈholiday

(informal) a holiday spent doing the same kind of thing that you do at work: The fire crew’s annual outing turned into a busman’s holiday when their bus caught fire. Fortunately, no one was hurt in the blaze.This phrase may refer to the drivers of horse-drawn vehicles in the 19th century. When they were not working, they often rode as passengers on their own buses to make sure that the replacement driver was treating their horses well.
See also: holiday