black eye

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black eye

1. Literal discoloration in the area surrounding the eye(s) due to an accumulation of blood. He had a pretty bad black eye after the bully punched him in the face. I had two black eyes for several days after my car accident.
2. By extension, a blemish to one's reputation. That food critic's negative review really gave a black eye to my restaurant.
See also: black, eye

black eye

 
1. Lit. a bruise near the eye from being struck. (*Typically have ~; get ~; give someone ~.) I got a black eye from walking into a door. I have a black eye where John hit me.
2. Fig. harm done to one's character. (*Typically have ~; get ~; give someone ~.) Mary got a black eye because of her constant complaining. The whole group now has a black eye, and it will take years to recover our reputation.
See also: black, eye

black eye

A mark of shame, a humiliating setback, as in That there are enough homeless folks to need another shelter is a black eye for the administration . This metaphor alludes to having discolored flesh around the eye resulting from a blow. The term is also used literally, as in The mugger not only took Bill's wallet but gave him a black eye. [Late 1800s]
See also: black, eye

a black ˈeye

an area of dark skin (= a bruise) around the eye caused by an accident, somebody hitting you, etc: How did you get that black eye?
See also: black, eye

black eye

n. a moral blemish; an injury to the prestige of someone or something. That kind of behavior can give us all a black eye.
See also: black, eye
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick how they had all been down in a body to inspect the furniture and fittings- up of the house, which the young couple were to tenant, after the Christmas holidays; at which communication Bella and Trundle both coloured up, as red as the fat boy after the taproom fire; and the young lady with the black eyes and the fur round the boots, whispered something in Emily's ear, and then glanced archly at Mr.
Pickwick's name is attached to the register, still preserved in the vestry thereof; that the young lady with the black eyes signed her name in a very unsteady and tremulous manner; that Emily's signature, as the other bridesmaid, is nearly illegible; that it all went off in very admirable style; that the young ladies generally thought it far less shocking than they had expected; and that although the owner of the black eyes and the arch smile informed Mr.
Winkle gallantly inquired if it couldn't be done by deputy: to which the young lady with the black eyes replied 'Go away,' and accompanied the request with a look which said as plainly as a look could do, 'if you can.
But the girl with the black eyes caught his arm, following him and dragging her companion after her, as she cried:
He noticed the vacillation of surprise passing over the steady curiosity of the black eyes fastened on his face as if the woman revolutionist received the sound of his voice into her pupils instead of her ears.
I stayed at home next day," he said, bending down a little and plunging his glance into the black eyes of the woman so that she should not observe the trembling of his lips.
At these words, the effect of which he watched closely, the lady with the black eyes uttered a cry of joy, leant out of the carriage window, and seeing the cavalier approaching, held out her arms, exclaiming:
How could any one have interpreted the gruesome joy of this young professor with the pale face and the black eyes, who stood earnestly singing, whispering, and shouting into a dead man's ear?
I heard you're really into getting drunk and playing the black eye game.
The first work in the show was a self-portrait supposedly inspired by the black eye the artist garnered while climbing rocks on the seashore of Long Island's East End.
Billy Tallon, the Queen Mother's favourite page at Clarence House, has been sporting the black eye for the past couple of days.
A fellow drinker said: "When I asked him how he got the black eye, he said: 'I smashed the house up.
Hopper also reiterated that he preferred that their conflict, which he calls the Black Eye incident, be resolved amicably.