the berries

the berries

verb
See also: berry
References in classic literature ?
On they wandered and on, singing as they went, till at length they found the berries, and ate heartily.
When night came again I found, with pleasure, that the fire gave light as well as heat and that the discovery of this element was useful to me in my food, for I found some of the offals that the travellers had left had been roasted, and tasted much more savoury than the berries I gathered from the trees.
The man knew there was no nourishment in the berries, but he chewed them patiently with a hope greater than knowledge and defying experience.
It was composed of stringy filaments saturated with water, like the berries, and devoid of nourishment.
They were sombre blues, opaque like a delicately carved bowl in lapis lazuli, and yet with a quivering lustre that suggested the palpitation of mysterious life; there were purples, horrible like raw and putrid flesh, and yet with a glowing, sensual passion that called up vague memories of the Roman Empire of Heliogabalus; there were reds, shrill like the berries of holly -- one thought of Christmas in England, and the snow, the good cheer, and the pleasure of children -- and yet by some magic softened till they had the swooning tenderness of a dove's breast; there were deep yellows that died with an unnatural passion into a green as fragrant as the spring and as pure as the sparkling water of a mountain brook.
Their disappearance made him doubt, he said, whether the berries had not left off growing in the broad pastures and along the shady country lanes.
I turned back the papery triangular sheaths that protected the berries and ate a few.
You then need to attend to the berries growing, either by watering, weeding, and even choosing your own way of ridding any bug-type infestation.
Remove the pan from the freezer, place the berries in sealed plastic bags and return them to the freezer for up to six months.
Solanum berries, for example, aren't particularly heavy compared with other ornaments, and among five decorative fruits, the berries tied for first in holding their looks.
The berries are covered with malic trod ascorbic acid, and the drink tastes like a combination of lemonade and apple juice.
The berries hang on into early spring unless devoured by songbirds, bobwhite, deer, squirrels, or wild turkey.
The berries are waiting for you this month around Watsonville
Plop, plop, plop sound the berries as they land in the pail.