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on bad terms

In a state of utter disagreement, dislike, or contempt with someone else. My ex-husband and I wanted to part amicably, but ever since the divorce trial started, we have been on really bad terms.
See also: bad, on, term

blanket term

A word or phrase used to describe a broad range of similarly related things, usually resulting in diluting the specific meaning of individual items. "Idiom" is often used as a blanket term for any element of language that is used strangely or uniquely by its users. "American" can be seen as something of a blanket term, considering how drastically people differ from one part of the country to the next.
See also: blanket, term

bring (someone) to terms

To compel a person or group to agree to or do something, especially a set of demands or conditions. The rebels' unflinching siege of the king's palace eventually brought the government to terms.
See also: bring, term

in layman's terms

In words that can be understood by people outside of a given profession or field of expertise, i.e., without the use of jargon or highly technical terms. Chronic atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries has stopped oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart, leading to a myocardial infarction. In layman's terms, you've suffered a heart attack. I wish these software agreements would be written in layman's terms, rather than this legalese gobbledygook.
See also: term

contradiction in terms

A phrase or expression that causes confusion because it contains words or ideas that contradict each other; an oxymoron. Jumbo shrimp is such a contradiction in terms.
See also: contradiction, term

half term

A brief holiday that takes places in the middle of an academic term. Primarily heard in UK. I can't wait until half term—I need a break from school! Where are you traveling to during half term?
See also: half, term

inkhorn term

An obscure term from another language (most often Latin or Greek), typically used in an attempt to highlight the speaker's intelligence. I can't stand that guy and his inkhorn terms—I feel like I need to have a dictionary on hand just to talk to him!
See also: term

on talking terms

Being amicable enough with someone as to have a conversation with him or her. A: "I didn't realize that you and Stella were on talking terms again after your fight." B: "Yeah, ever since we apologized to each other, we've been getting along great!" I'm not on talking terms with him right now, so you better not talk to him either.
See also: on, talk, term

red-flag term

A word that is particularly offensive or controversial and thus sparks an immediate emotional reaction. The phrase may reference the red flag because it is the tool traditionally used by matadors to aggravate bulls. How dare you say a red-flag term like that to me, your own mother! Please don't say any red-flag terms at this dinner party.
See also: term

come to terms

(about someone or something) and come to terms (on someone or something) [for two or more people] to reach an accord on someone or something. Ed and Alice came to terms about money. They did not come to terms on the price.
See also: come, term

come to terms

 (with someone or something)
1. to come to an agreement with someone. I finally came to terms with my lawyer about his fee. Bob, you have to come to terms with your father.
2. to learn to accept someone or something. She had to come to terms with the loss of her sight. She couldn't come to terms with her estranged husband.
See also: come, term

contradiction in terms

a statement containing a seeming contradiction. A wealthy pauper is a contradiction in terms. A straight-talking politician may seem to be a contradiction in terms.
See also: contradiction, term

in glowing terms

Fig. using words of praise; using complimentary expressions. The college president described his accomplishments in glowing terms and awarded him with an honorary degree.
See also: glow, term

in no uncertain terms

Cliché in very specific and direct language. I was so mad. I told her in no uncertain terms to leave and never come back. I told him in no uncertain terms to stop calling me.
See also: term

in terms of something

regarding something; concerning something. I don't know what to do in terms of John's problem. Now, in terms of your proposal, don't you think you're asking for too much?
See also: of, term

on good terms (with someone)

friendly with someone; able to interact well and be friends with someone. Bill is on good terms with the people he works with. We are not on very good terms and don't speak to each other much.
See also: good, on, term

on speaking terms (with someone)

on friendly terms with someone. (Often with the negative.) I'm not on speaking terms with Mary. We had a serious disagreement. We're not on speaking terms.
See also: on, speaking, term

in the long term

also for the long term
involving a long period of time Better teacher training will make a big difference to the school in the long term. For the long term, we hope our plans will create a large number of jobs.
Related vocabulary: take the long view
See also: long, term

in the short term

also for the short term
in the near future In the short term, the tax would bring money into the treasury, but after that, it would cost the government more each year.
See also: short, term

over the long term

for a long period of time for the long haul Experts say it's the best place over the long term to put your savings.
See also: long, term

over the short term

for a brief period of time only Profits will rise over the short term, but over the long term, no one really can predict.
See also: short, term

come to terms with something

to begin to accept and deal with something difficult or unpleasant She's never really come to terms with her son's death. It's very hard coming to terms with the fact that you'll never have children.
Related vocabulary: come to grips with something
See also: come, term

in no uncertain terms

very clearly She was told in no uncertain terms that the magazine had no interest in her short stories.
See also: term

in terms of something

in relation to something Cheryl was speaking in terms of improving students' grades by teaching them how to study. Getting laid off from his job affected him more emotionally than in terms of the loss of income. Related vocabulary: with regard to something
See also: of, term

on good terms (with somebody)

friendly with someone or with each other Although she is on good terms with her parents now, Angie said she doesn't want to live with them, even for a short time. Even after their divorce, they remained on good terms.
Usage notes: also on bad terms (with someone), with the opposite meaning: She and her brother have been on bad terms for many years.
See also: good, on, term

on speaking terms

friendly enough to talk We have heard from various people that the coach is barely on speaking terms with his best pitcher.
Usage notes: often used in the form not on speaking terms: The two nations have not been on speaking terms for a couple of decades.
See also: on, speaking, term

a contradiction in terms

a phrase that is confusing because it contains words that seem to have opposite meanings A British summer is a bit of a contradiction in terms. Euro Disney always seems to me a contradiction in terms because Disney is so typically American.
See also: contradiction, term

be on good terms with somebody

to be friendly with someone We were always on good terms with our neighbours.
See also: good, on, term

not be on speaking terms

to be refusing to talk to someone because you have had an argument and are still angry with them (often + with ) She's not on speaking terms with her ex-husband. Jeanette and her mother haven't been on speaking terms since the wedding.
See be speaking out of both sides of mouth
See also: on, speaking, term

in the long/medium/short term

a long, medium, or short time in the future Cuts in company spending now should lead to profits in the long term. In the short term, temporary housing will be provided for all of the flood victims.
See also: long, term

come to terms with something

to start to accept and deal with a difficult situation She's never really come to terms with her son's death. It's very hard coming to terms with the fact that you'll never have children.
See be on good terms with
See also: come, term

in no uncertain terms

if someone tells you something in no uncertain terms, they say it in a strong and direct way We were told in no uncertain terms that dishonesty would not be tolerated.
See also: term

bring to terms

Force someone to agree or continue negotiations, as in The creditors were determined to bring the company to terms. The terms here mean "the conditions for agreement." [First half of 1700s] Also see come to terms.
See also: bring, term

come to terms

1. Reach an agreement, as in The landlord and his tenants soon came to terms regarding repairs. [Early 1700s]
2. come to terms with. Reconcile oneself to, as in He'd been trying to come to terms with his early life. [Mid-1800s]
See also: come, term

contradiction in terms

A statement that seems to contradict itself, with one part of it denying another. For example, I've always believed that "a poor millionaire" was a contradiction in terms. [Late 1700s]
See also: contradiction, term

in no uncertain terms

Emphatically, definitely so. For example, Jane told them in no uncertain terms that she wanted no part of their practical joke. The double negative in this idiom serves for emphasis. [Mid-1900s] Also see in so many words.
See also: term

in terms of

1. As measured or indicated by, on the basis of. For example, How far is it in terms of miles? This usage originated in mathematics, where it alludes to numerical units. [Mid-1700s]
2. In relation to, with reference to, as in This film offers nothing in terms of satisfactory entertainment. [Late 1800s]
See also: of, term

on good terms

On a friendly footing, as in I'm on good terms with the manager, so I'll ask him to help you. Shakespeare used the phrase slightly differently in King Lear (1:2): "Parted you in good terms?" The precise current usage was first recorded in 1669. Also see on speaking terms.
See also: good, on, term

on speaking terms

1. Friendly enough to exchange superficial remarks, as in We're on speaking terms with the new neighbors.
2. Ready and willing to communicate, not alienated or estranged. For example, We are on speaking terms again after the quarrel. Both senses of this idiom commonly occur in the negative, as in Brett and his brother haven't been on speaking terms for years. The idiom was first recorded in 1786.
See also: on, speaking, term

bring to terms

To force (another) to agree.
See also: bring, term

come to terms with

1. To come to accept; become reconciled to: finally came to terms with his lack of talent.
2. To reach mutual agreement: The warring factions have at last come to terms.
See also: come, term

on speaking terms

1. Friendly enough to exchange superficial remarks: We're on speaking terms with the new neighbors.
2. Ready and willing to communicate; not alienated or estranged.
See also: on, speaking, term

in terms of

1. As measured or indicated by; in units of: distances expressed in terms of kilometers as well as miles; cheap entertainment, but costly in terms of time wasted.
2. In relation to; with reference to: "narcissistic parents who ... interpret their child's experience entirely in terms of their own history" (Richard Weissbourd).
See also: of, term
References in classic literature ?
Yes, yes; the terms, in every sense, are tempting enough," I replied impatiently.
But the real purpose of the proposal is to provide a vehicle for an initiative extending terms to get on the ballot in time for Senate President Don Perata and Assembly Speaker Fabian NuIllegal 'X-value' for character STYLs voided here ez -- the Democrat legislative leaders -- to stay in power a few more years.
More likely, though, is that P-E multiples will change as investors revise their outlook for long-term growth and returns, which suggests that delivering only in the near term is not sufficient to drive sustained value growth.
6 in 1999, and the mean number of terms in unique queries was 2.
In 1994, 59 percent of Idaho voters approved an initiative limiting terms for federal elected officials, state constitutional officers, members of the state legislature, local government officials, and school district officials.
The term "long-term care," in itself, means different things to different people, and this has made it difficult for people to focus on the issue.
Less well known, perhaps, is that companies with strong cash flows can also improve liquidity by structuring debt on a long-term, non-demand basis, in the form of term loans or subordinated debt.
Another important indicator of premium adequacy, and perhaps the easiest to use objectively, is the Long Term Care Insurance Experience Reports, published annually by the NAIC.
The sublease requires FM to make fixed, annual rental payments over both the primary term and (if exercised) the put renewal term.
Meanwhile, some representatives of the core group called Long-Term Capital to discuss the terms and conditions of the consortium approach.
The limit for the state Senate is two terms (eight years).
Activity that suggests itself or is recommended to the defense team can be examined in terms of the likelihood that it will advance the case toward the long-term goal.
When the order comes in, your customer usually indicates that it is subject to his terms and conditions of sale, frequently printed on the back side of the purchase order form.
Last year, California, Colorado and Oklahoma approved term limits for their state legislatures, and as many as 15 more states may vote on the issue this year.
Another says Proposition R would prevent council members from serving ``for life'' but fails to note that council members already are limited to two terms, or eight years.