temper

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short temper

A tendency to become angered, enraged, or upset very quickly or easily. I'm usually a pretty calm person, but whenever I start driving, I find I have such a short temper. That short temper of yours is going to get you into trouble one of these days.
See also: short, temper

temper tantrum

An extreme and childish display of unreasonable anger, frustration, or distemper. I can't believe you threw a temper tantrum like that just because I didn't want to go see some movie with you! Becca's been having really bad temper tantrums lately. I guess she's just going into the "terrible twos."
See also: tantrum, temper

keep one's temper

 and hold one's temper
to hold back an expression of anger. (The opposite of lose one's temper.) She should have learned to keep her temper when she was a child. Sally got thrown off the team because she couldn't hold her temper.
See also: keep, temper

lose one's temper (at someone or something)

Fig. to become angry at someone or something. Lisa lost her temper and began shouting at Bob. I hate to lose my temper at someone. I always end up feeling guilty.
See also: lose, temper

quick temper

 and short temper; short fuse
a bad temper that can be easily aroused. Tyler has a quick temper and doesn't mind letting everyone see it.
See also: quick, temper

temper something with something

 
1. Fig. to harden something, such as metal, with something. You have to temper the metal pieces with very high heat. The sheet of metal was tempered by the application of great pressure.
2. Fig. to soften the impact of something, such as news, with something. We can temper this disaster story a bit with a picture of the happy survivors. The news story was tempered with a paragraph of explanation and justification.
See also: temper

lose your temper

to become very angry If she contradicted him now, he would lose his temper and his blood pressure would shoot up.
See also: lose, temper

tempers fray

  also tempers become frayed
if tempers fray among a group of people, they all become angry Tempers frayed when, after waiting for hours, we were told there were no tickets left.
See also: fray, temper

hold one's temper

Also, keep one's temper. Refrain from expressing violent anger, maintain composure or poise. For example, Billy has to learn to hold his temper when he's frustrated, or If the chairman can keep his temper, the matter will get settled. [c. 1700] For an antonym, see lose one's temper.
See also: hold, temper

lose one's temper

Also, lose it. Give way to violent anger, lose self-control. For example, When she found out what Ann had done, she lost her temper, or He arrived without that important check, and then I just lost it completely. The first term dates from the early 1800s; the second slangy locution dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: lose, temper
References in classic literature ?
Wretchedly did he feel, that with all the cost and care of an anxious and expensive education, he had brought up his daughters without their understanding their first duties, or his being acquainted with their character and temper.
He had easily foreseen that her meek temper would overflow at so scandalous a proposal as repudiation, and he now profited by the tempest, to retire to a place where he was at least safe from any immediate violence on the part of her less excited, but certainly more dangerous husband.
He had never been an unhappy man; his own temper had secured him from that, even in his first marriage; but his second must shew him how delightful a welljudging and truly amiable woman could be, and must give him the pleasantest proof of its being a great deal better to choose than to be chosen, to excite gratitude than to feel it.
Bingley was endeared to Darcy by the easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition could offer a greater contrast to his own, and though with his own he never appeared dissatisfied.
D'Urberville's bad temper cleared up at sight of hers; and he laughed heartily.
Did not my father, my grandfathers, too, before me, lose their temper at times, in Heaven's name?
Not that I think a bad temper is really a fault in a man.
And please to bear in mind that I have a temper which feels even the smallest slights and injuries very keenly.
How dare you mention the loss of my temper in connection with this case?
My own idea is that her temper was made still more irritable by unhappiness in her married life.
Marilla Cuthbert, you don't mean to say that you are upholding her in such a terrible display of temper as we've just seen?
He expressed, indeed, so much resentment against an unforgiving temper, that the captain at last pretended to be convinced by his arguments, and outwardly professed to be reconciled.
It is true that when they were both in a good temper their enjoyment of life was redoubled.
A foolish wrangle followed; and Herncastle's unlucky temper got the better of him.
She had what they called an amiable temper, an affectionate temper.