temper


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short temper

A tendency to become angered, enraged, or upset very quickly or easily. I'm usually a pretty calm person, but whenever I start driving, I find I have such a short temper. That short temper of yours is going to get you into trouble one of these days.
See also: short, temper

temper tantrum

An extreme and childish display of unreasonable anger, frustration, or distemper. I can't believe you threw a temper tantrum like that just because I didn't want to go see some movie with you! Becca's been having really bad temper tantrums lately. I guess she's just going into the "terrible twos."
See also: tantrum, temper

keep one's temper

 and hold one's temper
to hold back an expression of anger. (The opposite of lose one's temper.) She should have learned to keep her temper when she was a child. Sally got thrown off the team because she couldn't hold her temper.
See also: keep, temper

lose one's temper (at someone or something)

Fig. to become angry at someone or something. Lisa lost her temper and began shouting at Bob. I hate to lose my temper at someone. I always end up feeling guilty.
See also: lose, temper

quick temper

 and short temper; short fuse
a bad temper that can be easily aroused. Tyler has a quick temper and doesn't mind letting everyone see it.
See also: quick, temper

temper something with something

 
1. Fig. to harden something, such as metal, with something. You have to temper the metal pieces with very high heat. The sheet of metal was tempered by the application of great pressure.
2. Fig. to soften the impact of something, such as news, with something. We can temper this disaster story a bit with a picture of the happy survivors. The news story was tempered with a paragraph of explanation and justification.
See also: temper

lose your temper

to become very angry If she contradicted him now, he would lose his temper and his blood pressure would shoot up.
See also: lose, temper

tempers fray

  also tempers become frayed
if tempers fray among a group of people, they all become angry Tempers frayed when, after waiting for hours, we were told there were no tickets left.
See also: fray, temper

hold one's temper

Also, keep one's temper. Refrain from expressing violent anger, maintain composure or poise. For example, Billy has to learn to hold his temper when he's frustrated, or If the chairman can keep his temper, the matter will get settled. [c. 1700] For an antonym, see lose one's temper.
See also: hold, temper

lose one's temper

Also, lose it. Give way to violent anger, lose self-control. For example, When she found out what Ann had done, she lost her temper, or He arrived without that important check, and then I just lost it completely. The first term dates from the early 1800s; the second slangy locution dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: lose, temper
References in classic literature ?
Having once set out, and felt that he had done so on this road to happiness, there was nothing on the side of prudence to stop him or make his progress slow; no doubts of her deserving, no fears of opposition of taste, no need of drawing new hopes of happiness from dissimilarity of temper.
Susan became the stationary niece, delighted to be so; and equally well adapted for it by a readiness of mind, and an inclination for usefulness, as Fanny had been by sweetness of temper, and strong feelings of gratitude.
He feared that principle, active principle, had been wanting; that they had never been properly taught to govern their inclinations and tempers by that sense of duty which can alone suffice.
Norris's resolving to quit Mansfield and devote herself to her unfortunate Maria, and in an establishment being formed for them in another country, remote and private, where, shut up together with little society, on one side no affection, on the other no judgment, it may be reasonably supposed that their tempers became their mutual punishment.
After first showing that my husband had had two opportunities of administering the poison--once in the medicine and once in the tea--the counsel for the Crown led the jury to infer that the prisoner had taken those opportunities to rid himself of an ugly and jealous wife, whose detestable temper he could no longer endure.
I suppose you think I have an awful temper, but I couldn't help it.
It was a dreadful thing for you to lose your temper like that, Anne.
You were rude and saucy and"--Marilla had a saving inspiration of punishment--"you must go to her and tell her you are very sorry for your bad temper and ask her to forgive you.
Ishmael listened to these replies, to his several demands, with that species of gathering indignation, with which the dullest tempers mount into the most violent paroxysms of rage.
For many hours the crones of the tribe had been going from lodge to lodge, in order to stimulate the tempers of the warriors to such a pass, as might leave but little room for mercy.
In my judgment, if your cases are left to Indian tempers, the policy of the Great Sioux will lead his people to sacrifice you all; nor do I put much dependence on his seeming love for me; therefore it becomes a question whether you are ready for such a journey; and if, being ready, whether this is not as good a time to start as another.
I often heard it said, too, that she had 'an unhappy temper.
Wheel-End Management System Meritor and Temper Axle Products Corp.
When his temper finally disappears after weeks of sulking and ignoring my efforts to smooth things over, he comes back and says he didn't mean it.
In the two-and-a-half years we've been together I've lost my temper with him three times but he sees red over anything.