team

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bat for the other team

1. To play for or support, either secretly or openly, the opposing side in a given contest or debate. Refers to cricket and baseball terminology, meaning to be a batter for the other team during a game. While the senator continues to publicly denounce the proposed tax law, many feel that he is really batting for the other team.
2. To be attracted to or have sexual relations with people of the same sex; a euphemism for being homosexual. I asked Simone out on a date, but it turns out that she bats for the other team.
See also: bat, other, team

tiger team

business jargon A team of highly skilled professionals who are assembled to investigate, test, or try to exploit the potential weaknesses of a company's or organization's security system. The tech giant has begun recruiting coders and hackers fresh out of college into tiger teams to stress test vulnerabilities in their new operating system.
See also: team, tiger

home team

A sports team that is playing in its regular arena in its home city. I always love to see the fans' enthusiasm and excitement when the home team wins.
See also: home, team

make the team

to have been qualified enough to be selected to play on a sports team. I tried out, but I didn't make the team.
See also: make, team

team player someone

who works well with the group; someone who is loyal to the group. Ted is a team player. I am sure that he will cooperate with us.
See also: player, team

team up (with someone)

to join with someone. I teamed up with Jane to write the report. I had never teamed up with anyone else before. I had always worked alone.
See also: team, up

*up against someone or something

in opposition to someone or something, as in a contest. (*Typically: be ~; come ~; go ~; run ~; team ~.) Let's team up against Paul and Tony in the footrace. We came up against a very strong team.
See also: up

*up against something

 
1. Fig. resting firmly against something. (*Typically: be ~; place something ~.) The car is up against the back of the garage! Back out a little!
2. Fig. in conflict with something; facing something as a barrier. (Fig. on {2}. *Typically: be ~; go ~.) l am up against some serious problems.
See also: up

team up (with somebody/something)

to join with another person or group to achieve something The two companies teamed up to provide a new electronic news service. Feer first teamed up with Laff in high school to do cartoons for the school newspaper.
See also: team, up

up against somebody/something

in opposition to someone or something In the music competition, Tyler was up against some of the best singers in the country. Next week, our field hockey team will go up against the best team in this area.
See also: up

team up with

Form an association with, as in Our pediatrician is teaming up with specialists in such areas as orthopedics and cardiology. This expression alludes to the harnessing together of draft animals, such as oxen. [First half of 1900s]
See also: team, up

up against

Contending or confronted with, as in I'm up against a strong opponent in this election. This idiom is also put as up against it, which means "in serious difficulty, especially in desperate financial straits." For example, When the collection agency called again, we knew we were up against it. [Late 1800s]
See also: up

team up

v.
1. To form or join a team or an association: We decided to team up and combine our resources. The police are teaming up with schools to prevent violence.
2. To combine someone into a team or an association: The coach teamed me up with two of the worst athletes in the school. My boss teamed up the best workers for the project.
See also: team, up

team Xerox

n. the imaginary source of copied documents, such as term papers. (Implies cheating or plagiarism. Xerox is a protected trade name.) I got the term paper in on time with the help of team Xerox.
See also: team

up against

Confronted with; facing: up against a strong opponent.
See also: up

take one for the team

To make a sacrifice on behalf of the group. The “classic” use of the phrase is when a baseball batter deliberately allows himself to be hit by a pitched ball that forces a home run to win a tied game. Another scenario: your pal wants to go out on a date with a real babe, but the babe won't go unless your pal finds a date for her homely friend. Your pal begs you. You accept. You're taking one for the team.
See also: one, take, team