tap someone's claret

tap (one's) claret

To draw blood, typically in some sort of fight. "Claret" is a type of red wine. A: "Who tapped your claret?" B: "Bill punched me in the nose. Can you help me clean up this blood?" Do you challenge me to a fight? Well, I will most certainly tap your claret—I hope you're ready for that!
See also: claret, tap

tap someone's claret

make someone's nose bleed by a blow with the fist. informal
See also: claret, tap
References in classic literature ?
His unpopularity with the blackguard multitude at the moment prevented my following his remains, but I helped to lay him in his coffin.
Tookey, the deputy-clerk, who shared the unpopularity common to deputies, turned very red, but replied, with careful moderation-- "Mr.
By murdering a large and respected family in cold blood and afterward depositing their bodies in the water companies' reservoir, you will gain much unpopularity in the neighborhood of your crime, and even robbing a church will get you cordially disliked, especially by the vicar.
Then,the car hit the roof of the gatehouse smartly, snapped a flag staff, played a tune upon some telegraph wires, and sent a broken wire like a whip-lash to do its share in accumulating unpopularity.
Notwithstanding the unpopularity of industrial work, the school continued to increase in numbers to such an extent that by the middle of the second year there was an attendance of about one hundred and fifty, representing almost all parts of the state of Alabama, and including a few from other states.
The armies were divided, there was no unity of command, and Barclay was unpopular; but from this confusion, division, and the unpopularity of the foreign commander in chief, there resulted on the one hand indecision and the avoidance of a battle (which we could not have refrained from had the armies been united and had someone else, instead of Barclay, been in command) and on the other an ever-increasing indignation against the foreigners and an increase in patriotic zeal.
But some enchantment had put both man and woman beyond the reach of malice and unpopularity.
Cornelius, at that period, as William of Orange said, began to enjoy the most perfect unpopularity.
This unavoidable appearance of mystery, and the strictly retired life which my studies compel me to lead, offend the narrow-minded people in my part of the county, close to Barkingham; and the unpopularity of my pursuits has followed me here.