tall one

tall one

n. a large drink; a long drink. (Compare this with short one.) She ordered a tall one and sat back to cool off.
See also: one, tall
References in classic literature ?
However, it is the tall one, the one of the private lessons, that is the most remarkable.
The tall one fought with a man from Chatfield Corners and beat him severely.
The blatant soldier often convulsed whole files by his biting sarcasms aimed at the tall one.
Such a person found, he proposed to bring him there on the ensuing night, when the tall one was taken off, and Miss Miggs had purposely retired; and then that Dolly should be gagged, muffled in a cloak, and carried in any handy conveyance down to the river's side; where there were abundant means of getting her smuggled snugly off in any small craft of doubtful character, and no questions asked.
Pavel, the tall one, was said to be an anarchist; since he had no means of imparting his opinions, probably his wild gesticulations and his generally excited and rebellious manner gave rise to this supposition.
You needn't put on airs, Charlie, though you are a tall one, for Rose likes Archie better than you; she said she did because he treated her respectfully.
Being a very tall one, and of luxuriant growth, it had been propped up against the side of the house, and was literally covered with a rare and very beautiful species of white rose.
The tall one, then, had done the murder, if murder there was.
M'Leod--"that tall one, I saw out of the scullery window--did she tell you she was always here in the spirit?
That must have been when the tall one thought worst about her sister and the house.
He commenced dressing at top by donning his beaver hat, a very tall one, by the by, and then --still minus his trowsers -- he hunted up his boots.
Let's have a game at billiards," one of his friends said--the tall one, with lacquered mustachios.
Harrison's -- the big, tall one -- had wandered over here that day again and broke into the yard, and it got into the back porch, unbeknowns to us, and it was there when the minister appeared in the doorway.
She is sleeping like a log; you can see that quite well,' so says the tall one.
The low houses of London look so much more homely than the tall ones that I never pass them without dropping a blessing on their builders, but this house was ridiculous; indeed it did not call itself a house, for over the door was a board with the inscription "This space to be sold," and I remembered, as I rang the bell, that this notice had been up for years.