talk sense


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talk sense

To present a reasonable, logical, and coherent standpoint; to speak clearly and rationally. You're not talking sense, Bill—how on earth would a plan like that be feasible? I'm glad someone is finally talking some sense in this meeting!
See also: sense, talk

talk sense

Speak rationally and coherently, as in Ranting and raving won't help; it's time we talked sense, or I wish you'd talk some sense into that son of yours. Shakespeare used this idiom in slightly different form in The Merry Wives of Windsor (2:1): "Believe it, Page, he speaks sense."
See also: sense, talk

talk sense

To speak rationally and coherently.
See also: sense, talk
References in periodicals archive ?
His comments were reasoned and fair and again and again I find that ethnic minorities talk sense when those who purport to "protect" them behave foolishly.
Parents do talk sense to their children, invariably it takes place every minute of every day and it is called "reality".
One of them, Thomas the cop (Michael Landes), is trying to talk sense into the agitated girl when the awful accident she's predicting occurs - and takes her friends' lives.
They now realise I can do other things, and I can talk sense about the economy, transport, foreign affairs and human rights.
Chil ren an younger faces in general, talk sense this week.
To find out more 0901 6093150 AQUARIUS (Jan 21/Feb 19): Youngsters talk sense this week and seem to be able to see life without the limitations you have been subject to.
Has he turned up to talk sense into his fellow culture vulture or, in typical Ted style, is he giving him a green light to get on with his fling?
Of all the Anglican clergy, only the Pakistan-born Bishop of Rochester Dr Michael Nazir-Ali and the Ugandan Archbishop of York, John Sentamu, seem to talk sense these days" - Sir Bernard Ingham.
But if Scargill had been prepared to talk sense, we could have got on much earlier with some of the technological developments which are going on in the world and could have created a market for coal that can be burnt cleanly.
His not- always-patient nurse, Sharona (Bitty Schram), must constantly talk sense into him and keep him from leaping headlong off the deep end - they make for a nice little comedy team; his former boss (Ted Levine) routinely expresses his exasperation with this jittery gumshoe.
Suddenly, the voices that count are starting to talk sense.