take offence (at something)

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take offence (at something)

To be or feel insulted, offended, or humiliated by something. Primarily heard in UK. I know your jokes were made completely in jest, but I couldn't help taking offence at them. I noticed your parents leaving in a bit of a huff earlier; I do hope they haven't taken offence.
See also: offence, take
References in periodicals archive ?
CLEARLY the fine academics at Norwich's University of East Anglia didn't read my column a couple of weeks ago on the growing, utterly inane trend for taking offence over things that are truly inoffensive.
NAME: Buster APPEARANCE: Grey, with one crooked whisker SPECIAL SKILLS: Buster is all heart, never taking offence when his people carry on eating cereal as he tries to drink the milk from it.
So it was someone else in the dressing room who decided to kick up a media storm by taking offence on behalf of both the players.
Rather than taking offence at the measure, legitimate tradesmen should welcome rigorous checking within their industry.
A MAN who launched a violent and sustained attack on a wheelchair-bound victim after taking offence to something he said has been found guilty of his murder.
Yes, ex-smokers do rant a little and I'm happy for you that you can still sit around a smoking atmosphere without taking offence.
I said they were to blame for taking offence so easily.
A man left another brain damaged after taking offence when his girlfriend was described as a Teletubby, a court was told yesterday.
Instead of taking offence, however, the priest immediately understood it was he who had erred and demurely backed away, explaining, "My apologies, sir--I didn't realize you were Catholic.
Francis was dismissed from the dug-out during his side's 1-1 draw at Selhurst Park after apparently taking offence when he heard the Latvian keeper laughing just after Palace had fallen behind to Andy Tod's 76th- minute goal.
The court heard it was Clancy's fourth aggravated vehicle taking offence in as many years.
Of taking offence when English football commentators and others seem to think that only one country in the UK matters.