take after (one)

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take after (one)

1. To resemble someone else, as in appearance, behavior, attitude, etc. She takes after me with her fair hair and skin, but she has her mother's eyes. He takes after his grandfather with his views about the war for independence.
2. To pursue something that someone else (often a family member) has already done; to follow someone as an example. He plans to take after his father, who was a master sergeant in the Marine Corps. I'm afraid he's been taking after his older brother lately, getting into trouble at school and with the law.
See also: after, take

take after someone

to resemble a close, older relative. Don't you think that Sally takes after her mother? No, Sally takes after her Aunt Ann.
See also: after, take

take after

Follow the example of; also, resemble in appearance, temperament, or character. For example, Bill took after his uncle and began working as a volunteer for the Red Cross. [Mid-1500s]
See also: after, take

take after

v.
1. To resemble someone, especially a parent, grandparent, or other predecessor, in appearance, temperament, or character: She takes after her grandfather in her talent for design. You take after your mother—you have her nose and eyes.
2. To follow someone or something as an example: Don't take after your older brother—he's a bad influence.
See also: after, take