take the plunge


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Related to take the plunge: more the merrier, raring to go, on a roll, pillar to post

take the plunge

to marry someone. I'm not ready to take the plunge yet. Sam and Mary took the plunge.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

Venture something, commit oneself, as in You've been living together for a year, so when are you going to take the plunge and get married? It is also put as make the plunge, plunge alluding to diving in a body of water. [Mid-1800s]
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

COMMON If you take the plunge, you decide to do something that you have been thinking of doing for some time, even though it is difficult, risky, or unpleasant. Helen decided to take the plunge and turned professional in 1991. Finally, Mona took the plunge. `I have something to tell you,' she said.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

commit yourself to a course of action about which you are nervous. informal
See also: plunge, take

take the ˈplunge

(informal) decide to do something new, difficult or risky, especially after thinking about it for some time: After working for twenty years he’s decided to take the plunge and go back to college. OPPOSITE: get/have cold feet
A plunge is an act of jumping or diving into water.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

tv. to marry someone. I’m not ready to take the plunge yet.
See also: plunge, take

take the plunge

Informal
To begin an unfamiliar venture, especially after hesitating: After a three-year engagement, they're finally taking the plunge.
See also: plunge, take