take someone out

take out

1. verb To remove or extract someone or something from something or some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." You'll need to take out a few more plates so we'll have enough for all our guests. I'm taking the kids out of school early so we can catch our flight to New York. They're taking my stitches out next week.
2. verb To bring, carry, or remove something to a specific location outside. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." Don't forget to take out the trash tonight, or it won't get picked up until next week. We need to take everything out of the house while it's being fumigated.
3. verb To withdraw money from an account. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." How much money should I take out for our trip? He took an extra $20 out to pay for the movie tickets.
4. verb To bring someone somewhere as a date or companion. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." She asked if she could take me out sometime for dinner or a movie. I'm taking out my parents to dinner to thank them for their help.
5. verb To borrow something in an official or formal manner. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." You can take out three books at a time from the library. Remember, you must sign your name to the register if you plan to take any equipment out for more than a day.
6. verb To kill or murder someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." The mob boss ordered his goons to take the witness out. I almost got taken out by that falling tree!
7. verb To incapacitate or neutralize someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." The tight end took out the linebacker who was trying to tackle the quarterback. He took out his opponents in the election with an incredibly effective smear campaign.
8. verb To destroy, disable, or critically damage something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." The hurricane took out power lines across the state. I hope the blast didn't take the generator out. The burglars took out the security system before breaking in.
9. verb To obtain compensation for something from a different source or in a different form. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." We'll be taking the cost of the computer you broke out of your paycheck. He couldn't pay me back the $250, so I took it out by having him paint the house for me.
10. verb To formally apply for and obtain or secure something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." She is taking out a lawsuit against her former employer for improper dismissal from her job. We're taking out a loan to help pay for the wedding.
11. verb To bring a domesticated animal, typically a dog, outside for exercise or to urinate or defecate. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "out." John, will you take the dog out? He's been scratching at the door for 10 minutes.
12. noun Food from a restaurant that is picked up and taken home or somewhere else to be eaten. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated or spelled as one word. Primarily heard in US. I don't feel like cooking tonight, do you want to just get takeout?
See also: out, take

take someone out

1. tv. to block someone, as in a football game. I was supposed to take the left end out, but I was trapped under the center.
2. tv. to kill someone. (Underworld.) The boss told Rocko to take out Marlowe.
3. tv. to date someone. She wanted to take him out for an evening.
See also: out, someone, take
References in periodicals archive ?
I think many of the senior players will say that in the past, you could take someone out to dinner twice," said Elliott.
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