take someone off

take off

1. verb Literally, to physically remove something or someone from someone, oneself, or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." He took off his shoes before entering the house. Someone has taken the picture off the wall. The police began taking passengers off the airplane.
2. verb To decrease; to remove from an existing amount. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." They offered to take a further 10% off if we signed up for paper-free billing. I'm trying to take off a few pounds ahead of the wedding so I can fit into my suit.
3. verb To release something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." Please don't take your seat belt off until the car is in park. He took off the restraining bolt so that the cattle could push their way through the gate.
4. verb To rise into the air in flight. What time does the plane take off? They've already taken off, so it's too late to say goodbye.
5. verb To increase in activity very rapidly and to a large degree. Sales really took off after we got that movie star to appear in our advertisements. My career didn't take off until I moved to Los Angeles. The party really took off after 9 PM.
6. verb To steal or take something without permission. In this usage, the phrase is typically followed by "with (something)." The thief took off with my bicycle. I think John took off with the car. He is in so much trouble when he comes back!
7. verb To leave or move very quickly. The kids took off as soon as they heard the sirens. After the accident, the car took off before I could get the license plate number.
8. verb To depart for someplace. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." Sorry, I need to take off or I'll be late for my meeting. He took himself off to his grandfather's cabin in the woods to think about all that had happened.
9. verb To remove someone from some activity or endeavor. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "off." I can't believe they took us off the project after all the work we did for it! She's taking herself off the investigation due to a conflict of interest.
10. noun The act of rising into the air in flight. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated or spelled as one word. Please prepare for takeoff. Takeoff was a bit rough, but the rest of the flight was smooth.
See also: off, take

take someone off

tv. to kill someone. (Underworld.) The mob took the witness off a week before the trial.
See also: off, someone, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Any time you can take someone off of the UNOS list--whether on the top or the middle or the bottom--others are moving up.
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