take someone in

take in

1. To absorb and comprehend something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "in." I know it's a lot to take in, so let me know if you have any questions. I wasn't able to take every detail in, but I got the gist of it.
2. To admit someone into one's care or employment. In this usage, a name, noun, or pronoun can be used between "take" and "in." My aunt took me and my brother in when our parents died. The firm was kind enough to take me as a legal aide in while I was working on my law degree.
3. To offer someone temporary shelter or care. In this usage, a name, noun, or pronoun can be used between "take" and "in." My wife has a bad habit of taking in stray dogs. We're already taking in more guests than we're supposed to, so I don't know where you think we'll fit ten more!
4. To receive as a profit or earnings. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "take" and "in." We took more in this month than we did all of last year! Managers are instructed to reprimand staff who don't take in at least $1,000 of sales every day.
5. To breathe or inhale something. I'm eager to get out of the city and take in some mountain air!
See also: take

take someone in

1. and rope someone in tv. to cheat or deceive someone. He might try to rope you in. Keep an eye on him and count your change.
2. tv. to give shelter to someone. We took her in and gave her some soup and a place to stay.
See also: someone, take
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