take root


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take root

 
1. Lit. [for a plant] to develop roots in soil or some other growing medium. The new plants should take root in a few weeks and start growing.
2. Fig. to begin to take hold or have effect. Things will begin to change when my new policies take root. My ideas began to take root and influence other people.
See also: root, take

take root

Become established or fixed, as in We're not sure how the movement took root, but it did so very rapidly. This idiom transfers the establishment of a plant, whose roots settle into the earth, to other matters. [Late 1500s]
See also: root, take

take root

COMMON If an idea or belief takes root, it becomes established or begins to develop. That was when the idea of starting up his own picture library began to take root. Green politics have taken firm root in Alsace, where the Green Party have a chance of gaining two seats.
See also: root, take

take root

become fixed or established.
See also: root, take

take ˈroot

become firmly established: His ideas on education never really took root; they were just too extreme.
If a plant takes root it develops roots and attaches itself to the ground.
See also: root, take

take root

1. To become established or fixed.
2. To become rooted.
See also: root, take