take root


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take root

 
1. Lit. [for a plant] to develop roots in soil or some other growing medium. The new plants should take root in a few weeks and start growing.
2. Fig. to begin to take hold or have effect. Things will begin to change when my new policies take root. My ideas began to take root and influence other people.
See also: root, take

take root

to become established take hold The organization took root all over the world and began expanding its many programs.
Usage notes: often refers to an idea or set of beliefs: Has democracy truly taken root in the region?
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of take root (to start to grow roots in the ground)
See also: root, take

take root

if an idea, belief, or system takes root somewhere, it starts to be accepted or established there Democracy is now struggling to take root in most of these countries.
See also: root, take

take root

Become established or fixed, as in We're not sure how the movement took root, but it did so very rapidly. This idiom transfers the establishment of a plant, whose roots settle into the earth, to other matters. [Late 1500s]
See also: root, take

take root

1. To become established or fixed.
2. To become rooted.
See also: root, take