take to

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take to

1. To carry or deliver someone or something to someone or some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "take" and "to." Would you mind taking these letters to the post office for me? I'm taking Jenny to her mom's house for the weekend. Take this to Bill so he can sign it.
2. To flee or escape to some place. The suspect took to the swamp in a desperate effort to evade the police. The disgraced CEO took to Russia to avoid extradition by US authorities.
3. To make use of a particular public platform to express something. The politician took to social media to complain about the way her words had been misrepresented. The police are taking to local television stations to appeal for information about the suspect.
4. To begin doing something as a habit, hobby, pastime, or steady practice. My husband has taken to gardening now that he's retired. I've been taking to cycling to work as a way of getting a bit more exercise.
5. To develop an attraction to or fondness of someone or something. I'm so happy that my parents have taken to my new girlfriend. I didn't think I would take to this kind of work, but I'm actually loving it so far!
See also: take

take something to someone or something

to carry something to someone or something. Should I take this package to Carol? Would you take this to the post office?
See also: take

take to someone or something

to become fond of or attracted to someone or something. Mary didn't take to her new job, and she quit after two weeks. The puppy seems to take to this new food just fine.
See also: take

take to

1. Have recourse to, go to, as in They took to the woods. [c. 1200]
2. Develop as a habit or steady practice, as in He took to coming home later and later. [c. 1300]
3. Become fond of, like, as in I took to him immediately, or The first time she skied she took to it. This expression, from the mid-1700s, is sometimes expanded to take to it like a duck to water, a simile dating from the late 1800s.
4. take to be. Understand, consider, or assume, as in I took it to be the right entrance. [Mid-1500s] Also see the subsequent entries beginning with take to.
See also: take

take to

v.
1. To change the location or status of something or someone: I took flowers to my friend's house. Her comments took the discussion to a more sophisticated level.
2. To escape or have recourse to something or some place: They knew we were on their trail, so they took to the woods.
3. To start doing something as a habit or a steady practice: After I graduated from college, I slowly took to waking up early.
4. To become fond of or attached to someone or something: That child has really taken to her. He took to the piano as if he were born to play it.
See also: take