take for granted


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take (someone or something) for granted

1. To consider something as being innately or unfailingly true, correct, real, or available. The plenitude of our natural resources has resulted in most people taking them for granted for most of human history. I guess I just took your support for granted, because I thought you would be there for me no matter what.
2. To underestimate or undervalue someone or something; to not properly recognize or appreciate someone or something. The boss takes us for granted, but if we weren't here, this whole company would collapse. I'm just getting fed up because it feels like you take everything I do around the house for granted.
See also: grant, take

take someone or something for granted

to expect someone or something to be always available to serve in some way without thanks or recognition; to value someone or something too lightly. I wish you didn't take me for granted. I guess that I take a lot of things for granted.
See also: grant, take

take for granted

1. Consider as true or real, anticipate correctly, as in I took it for granted that they'd offer to pay for their share but I was wrong. [c. 1600]
2. Underestimate the value of, become used to, as in The editors felt that the publisher was taking them for granted.
See also: grant, take

take somebody/something for ˈgranted

not value somebody/something just because they are/it is always there: Your problem is that you take your wife for granted. When was the last time you told her how much you appreciated her?We take so many things for granted these days: electricity, running water, cars...

take for granted

1. To consider as true, real, or forthcoming; anticipate correctly.
2. To underestimate the value of: a publisher who took the editors for granted.
See also: grant, take