take charge


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take charge (of someone or something)

to take (over) control of someone or something. The president came in late and took charge of the meeting. When the new manager took charge, things really began to happen.
See also: charge, take

take charge (of something)

to do something to control a situation or organization Germany, Switzerland, and France still have the best teams, and they will take charge of these games. When the union needed someone to clean up its finances, I took charge of the whole mess.
See also: charge, take

take charge

Assume control, command, or responsibility, as in I'll take charge of selling the tickets if you'll do the publicity, or They're not happy about the counselor who took charge of the children. [Late 1300s]
See also: charge, take

take charge

To assume control or command.
See also: charge, take
References in periodicals archive ?
In the conference "At the heart of our exchanges" the nurses explored the problems of teaching, educating, and helping the patients to take charge of their health.
The roadmap outlined in Taking Charge identifies three ways female senior executives take charge of their work and personal lives:
Two years ago Argentina's Horacio Elizondo became the first to take charge of the opening game and final of a World Cup.
We think it's important to take charge of menopause, and you need all the information you can get to do that.
Armstrong reaches into her 22-year career history with Boeing to share stories that will motivate and inspire women to take charge of their careers.
With the CareWise program, our members can take charge of their own health care needs and get immediate answers to their questions," said Donna Celestini, acting president of HMO Blue.