take away


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

take someone or something away (from someone or something)

to remove someone or something to some distance away from someone or something else; to remove someone or something from the possession of someone or something else. Take her away from me! Take away that horrible food.
See also: away, take

take something away (from someone or something)

to detract from someone or something. The bright costume on the soprano takes a lot away from the tenor, who is just as important. The main subject of the picture is good, but the busy background takes away a lot.
See also: away, take

take away

v.
1. To remove something: Someone took my books away. Can you take away the trash?
2. To have something as the effect of an experience: I did not take away a good impression of the way things are run there. He took away a black eye from that fight.
3. To take someone along to a new place: I wish you would take me away with you.
4. To arrest someone or send them to prison or another place of incarceration: The police were threatening to take me away, so I left the country. The police took away the suspects to the courthouse.
5. To awe someone; cause someone to be emotionally captivated: The final scene of the movie took me away.
6. To win something easily, by a wide margin, or dramatically: It was a tense series of games, but our team took it away in the end. That film took away five Oscars.
7. Chiefly British To buy food at a restaurant and take it somewhere else to eat: Let's take away some Chinese food for lunch.
8. take away from To detract from something: Drab curtains took away from the otherwise lovely room.
See also: away, take