take a leaf out of someone's book

take a leaf out of someone's book

Imitate or follow someone's example, as in Harriet took a leaf out of her mother's book and began to keep track of how much money she was spending on food . This idiom alludes to tearing a page from a book. [c. 1800]
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take

take a leaf out of someone's book

or

take a leaf from someone's book

COMMON If you take a leaf out of someone's book or take a leaf from their book, you copy them, usually because they were successful when they acted in that way. Note: The `leaf' in the last two expressions is a page of a book. Hollywood celebs should take a leaf out of Michael Douglas's book and make sure their websites are interesting and attractive. You're working too hard. Take a leaf from my book and relax!
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take

take a leaf out of someone's book

closely imitate or emulate someone in a particular way.
1999 London Student Maybe the other colleges should take a leaf out of Imperial's book and try pub games instead of sports.
See also: book, leaf, of, out, take
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