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Related to swathed: talismanic

swathe someone or something in something

to wrap or drape someone or something in something. Molly swathed her children in sheets to turn them into ghosts on Halloween. She swathed the statue in black velvet for the unveiling ceremony.
See also: swathe

swathe someone or something with something

to wrap or drape someone or something with something. The sculptor swathed his unfinished pieces with heavy drapes. The designer swathed the window with billows of taffeta.
See also: swathe

cut a (wide) swath

also cut a (wide) swathe
1. to attract a lot of interest or attention The two beautiful sisters cut a wide swath through our little town, and every male wanted to take them out. The new game is unusually inventive and has cut a wide swath in the video game market.
2. to cause a lot of destruction, death, or harm in a particular place Violent thunderstorms cut a swath of destruction through the area, blowing down trees and damaging houses.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of swath ( a line or strip of grass that has been cut)
See also: cut, swath

cut a swath/swathe through something

to cause a lot of destruction, death, or harm in a particular place or among a particular group of people Violent electrical storms cut a swath through parts of the South yesterday. The AIDS epidemic has already cut a swath through the fashion industry.
See also: cut, swath

swathe in

To wrap or bind with or as if with some bandages: The doctor swathed the patient's arm in gauze.
See also: swathe
References in classic literature ?
And there lay the hoary head of good Father Hooper upon the death pillow, with the black veil still swathed about his brow, and reaching down over his face, so that each more difficult gasp of his faint breath caused it to stir.
They were odd-looking fellows those courtiers, with their five or six shirts swathed around their bodies
There was a sort of sham soldier, a "naquois," as the slang expression runs, who was whistling as he undid the bandages from his fictitious wound, and removing the numbness from his sound and vigorous knee, which had been swathed since morning in a thousand ligatures.
They were blackened and tattered and bandaged; the hind-most one limped and had his head swathed in white, but the foremost one still carried himself as a Prince should do, for all that his left arm was in a sling and one side of his face scalded a livid crimson.
There was a motor-car with an old lady swathed in blue veils, and a lady's maid on the seat opposite, holding a King Charles's spaniel; there was a country-woman wheeling a perambulator full of sticks down the middle of the road; there was a bailiff in gaiters discussing the state of the cattle market with a dissenting minister--so she defined them.
On either side were rude gods, some grotesquely carved, others no more than shapeless logs swathed in rotten and indescribably filthy matting.
A big Chinaman, remarkably evil-looking, with his head swathed in a yellow silk handkerchief and face badly pock-marked, planted a pike-pole on the Reindeer's bow and began to shove the entangled boats apart.
She saw that he was bare-legged, with canvas shoes on his feet, and that his body was swathed in a heavy white sweater.
asked the young clerk, who could scarce keep from laughter at the sight of the hot little man so swathed in the great white cloak.
Priest-like, he wore a robe more white than foam, And, king-like, swathed himself in royal red, Three crowns of gold rose high upon his head; In splendor and in light the Pope passed home.
She wore a dress of some dark material, very plainly made; but swathed about her waist, outlining its fine curves, was a vivid girdle of red silk.
I am swathed in cant," she thought, "and it is good for me to be stripped of it.
If I did not myself sigh before them, and chatter with cold, and patiently LET myself be swathed in their pity!
Time was when travel-stained pilgrims rode in clattering parties through the city's welcome shades; time is when wayfarers, leading a gipsy life between haymaking time and harvest, and looking as if they were just made of the dust of the earth, so very dusty are they, lounge about on cool door-steps, trying to mend their unmendable shoes, or giving them to the city kennels as a hopeless job, and seeking others in the bundles that they carry, along with their yet unused sickles swathed in bands of straw.
He tripped and fell, clutched at the apron to save himself, and came to the ground swathed in it, giving the effect of an apron mysteriously endowed with life.