swallow


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Related to swallow: tree swallow

look like the cat that ate the canary

1. To appear smug and/or overly pleased with oneself to others, especially over something one has done, received, or accomplished. After her promotion, Janet spent the rest of the day looking like the cat that ate the canary.
2. To have the appearance of guilt but attempt to hide behind an air of smugness or feigned nonchalance. When questioned on the use of campaign funds for his own personal pleasure, the senator looked like the cat that ate the canary.
See also: ate, canary, cat, like, look

a hard pill to swallow

Something, especially a fact or piece of news, that is unpleasant or difficult but which is unavoidable or must be accepted. It was a hard pill to swallow learning that my father's fortune had been squandered. Her recent breakup with Janet was a hard pill to swallow.
See also: hard, pill, swallow

a tough pill to swallow

Something, especially a fact or piece of news, that is unpleasant or difficult but which is unavoidable or must be accepted. It was a tough pill to swallow learning that my father's fortune had been squandered. Her recent breakup with Janet was a tough pill to swallow.
See also: pill, swallow, tough

a bitter pill

An unwanted or unpleasant situation that someone is forced to accept. A shortening of the phrase, "a bitter pill to swallow." When Brett's parents stopped giving him money to pay his bills and told him to get a job, it was a bitter pill for him to swallow. Getting a poor performance review was a bitter pill, but it made me a better worker.
See also: bitter, pill

one swallow does not a spring make

One piece of evidence does not mean that something is definitely going to happen. I know you're excited about your exam grades, but you haven't gotten your report card yet, and one swallow does not a spring make.
See also: does, make, not, one, spring, swallow

one swallow does not make a spring

One piece of evidence does not mean that something is definitely going to happen. I know you're excited about your exam grades, but you haven't gotten your report card yet, and one swallow does not make a spring.
See also: does, make, not, one, spring, swallow

bitter pill to swallow

Fig. an unpleasant fact that has to be accepted. (Does not involve pills or swallowing.) It was a bitter pill for her brother to swallow when she married his enemy. We found his deception a bitter pill to swallow.
See also: bitter, pill, swallow

hard to believe

 and hard to swallow
not easily believed; hardly believable. Her story was hard to swallow, and it finally was proven to be a lie.
See also: believe, hard

look like the cat that swallowed the canary

Fig. to appear as if one had just had a great success. After the meeting John looked like the cat that swallowed the canary. I knew he must have been a success. Your presentation must have gone well. You look like the cat that swallowed the canary.
See also: canary, cat, like, look, swallow

One swallow does not make a summer,

 and One swallow does not a summer make.
Prov. You should not assume that something is true just because you have seen one piece of evidence for it. Amanda: I got a good grade on this quiz! My troubles in school are over. Nancy: One swallow does not a summer make.
See also: does, make, not, one, summer, swallow

strain at gnats and swallow camels

Prov. to criticize other people for minor offenses while ignoring major offenses. (Biblical.) Jill: Look at that. Edward is combing his hair at his desk. How unprofessional. Jane: Don't strain at gnats and swallow camels. There are worse problems than that around here.
See also: and, camel, gnat, strain, swallow

swallow one's pride

Fig. to forget one's pride and accept something humiliating. I had to swallow my pride and admit that I was wrong. When you're trying to master a new skill, you find yourself swallowing your pride quite often.
See also: pride, swallow

swallow someone or something up

 
1. Lit. to eat or gobble up someone or something. The fairy-tale wolf threatened to swallow the pig up in one bite. The wolf swallowed up the meat in one bite.
2. Fig. to engulf or contain something. The vast garage seemed to swallow the cars up. The huge sweater swallowed up the tiny child.
See also: swallow, up

swallow something down

to swallow something. Here, take this pill and swallow it down. Liz swallowed down the pill.
See also: down, swallow

swallow something hook, line, and sinker

Fig. to believe something completely. (These terms refer to fishing and fooling a fish into being caught.) I made up a story about why I was so late. The boss swallowed it hook, line, and sinker. I feel like a fool. I swallowed her lies hook, line, and sinker.
See also: and, sinker, swallow

take the bait

also swallow the bait
to accept something that was offered to get you to do something I flirted with Kate, teased her some, but she never took the bait. Others tried to focus on our disagreements, but we didn't take the bait and instead talked about what we can do together.
See also: bait, take

a bitter pill (to swallow)

an unpleasant situation that must be accepted Losing the championship was a bitter pill to swallow for a team that was used to winning every year. Having his fate in the hands of others is a bitter pill for this proud man.
See also: bitter, pill

swallow your pride

to admit that you have been wrong about someone or something He swallowed his pride and called his daughter to apologize. I swallowed my pride and asked for a second chance.
Usage notes: often said about something that has embarrassed you
See also: pride, swallow

hard to swallow

1. difficult to accept The terms of the agreement were hard to swallow, but I needed the work. My father's anger was very hard to swallow.
2. not easy to believe We found her excuse hard to swallow.
Related vocabulary: take something with a grain of salt
See also: hard, swallow

swallow up somebody/something

also swallow somebody/something up
to take in or absorb someone or something The suburbs are swallowing up all the farmland and open space in the region. She walked down the street, and the crowd just swallowed her up.
See also: swallow, up

swallow/take the bait

to accept something that is only being offered to you so that you will do something The offer of a free radio with every television proved very popular, and hundreds of shoppers swallowed the bait.
See rise to the bait
See also: bait, swallow

a bitter pill (to swallow)

  also bitter medicine
a situation that is unpleasant but must be accepted Losing the championship to a younger player was a bitter pill to swallow. Cuts in salaries are a dose of bitter medicine that may help the company to survive.
See also: bitter, pill

hard to swallow

if something that someone says is hard to swallow, it is difficult to believe I found her story rather hard to swallow.
See also: hard, swallow

one swallow doesn't make a summer

  (British & Australian)
something that you say which means because one good thing has happened, you cannot therefore be certain that more good things will happen and the whole situation will improve Okay, they won their last game but one swallow doesn't make a summer. They're still bottom of the league.
See also: make, one, summer, swallow

swallow your pride

to accept that you have to do something that you think is embarrassing or that you think you are too good to do Swallow your pride and call your daughter to tell her you're sorry.
See swallow the bait, one swallow doesn't make a summer
See also: pride, swallow

wish the ground would swallow you up

to wish that you could disappear because you feel very embarrassed Everyone in the room was staring at me and I stood there wishing the ground would swallow me up.
See also: ground, swallow, up, wish

bitter pill to swallow

An unpleasant fact, disappointment, or humiliation that is difficult to endure. For example, Failing the bar exam was a bitter pill to swallow, but he plans to try again next year . [Late 1500s]
See also: bitter, pill, swallow

look like the cat that ate the canary

Also, look like the cat that swallowed the canary. Appear smug and self-satisfied. For example, After she hit her third winning shot, Jeannie looked like the cat that ate the canary. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: ate, canary, cat, like, look

swallow one's pride

Humble oneself, as in She decided to swallow her pride and apologize. This idiom employs swallow in the sense of "refrain from expressing," a usage dating from the early 1600s.
See also: pride, swallow

swallow one's words

Take back what one said, as in If they win I'll have to swallow my words. George Farquhar used this idiom in The Inconstant (1702): "I have swallowed my words already; I have eaten them up." For a synonym, see eat one's words.
See also: swallow, word

hard to swallow

mod. difficult to believe. Your story is pretty hard to swallow, but I am beginning to believe it.
See also: hard, swallow

swallow

1. n. a puff of cigarette smoke. He took just one swallow and started coughing.
2. tv. to believe or accept something. (see also eat something up.) Nobody’s gonna swallow that nonsense.

swallow the dictionary

tv. to acquire an enormous vocabulary. (Usually in the past tense.) My uncle says I’ve swallowed the dictionary. That’s because I know so many big words.
See also: swallow

sword swallowing

n. fellatio. The headmaster caught him in an act of sword swallowing.
See also: swallow, sword
References in classic literature ?
So the Swallow flew over the great city, and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses, while the beggars were sitting at the gates.
Leaf after leaf of the fine gold the Swallow picked off, till the Happy Prince looked quite dull and grey.
The poor little Swallow grew colder and colder, but he would not leave the Prince, he loved him too well.
I am glad that you are going to Egypt at last, little Swallow," said the Prince, "you have stayed too long here; but you must kiss me on the lips, for I love you.
It is not to Egypt that I am going," said the Swallow.
So they threw it on a dust-heap where the dead Swallow was also lying.
The swallowing control centre is situated in the medullary area of the brain stem and receives inputs from the mouth and pharynx regarding the bolus size and consistency, the respiratory centre to coordinated swallowing and breathing and from cortical and subcortical areas of the brain all of which result in the modulation of and duration of different phases of the pharyngeal swallow, but the sequence of events remains consistent (Smithard, 2002; Kendall et al, 2000; Molfenter, 2014).
Observation of signs of oral and pharyngeal dysphagia Swallow screening evaluation is used to determine the need
The Remarkable Life and Career of Ellen Swallow Richards
HOLMFIRTH racer Bill Swallow has enjoyed some success - and the odd setback in the Isle of Man.
EFFORTS to find a new tenant for Stockton's landmark Swallow Hotel have stalled.
The NBSS had 74% of sensitivity (34 of 46) with the nursing and the speech pathologist in agreement with the patients passing the swallow screen.
AS THE phrase goes 'one swallow doesn't make a summer', because the swallow is just one of a troop of aerial acrobats performing above our heads, and subconsciously telling us that British summertime has arrived.
Swallow Solutions, LLC (Swallow Solutions), a life sciences company with a novel dysphagia treatment platform, announced today it has raised $1.
They discuss indications for intervention, the importance of treatment, relationships to other medical conditions, the anatomy and function of the swallowing mechanism, and the abnormal swallow and disorders that arise from neurological and head and neck disorders and diseases.