suspicion

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cloud of suspicion

A general sentiment of suspicion of wrongdoing or illegality. There's a cloud of suspicion in work after it came to light that someone has been stealing from the cash registers.
See also: cloud, of, suspicion

have a sneaking suspicion

To have a slight but persistent premonition or intuition (about something). Jimmy said he'd never be back, but I have a sneaking suspicion we'll see him again sooner or later.
See also: have, suspicion

above suspicion

Not suspected of any wrongdoing or crime. Because everyone thought he was such a good citizen, he remained above suspicion after the robbery.
See also: above, suspicion

under a cloud (of suspicion)

Viewed with distrust and/or thought to be dishonorable. Ever since that leak of private emails, everything the CEO has done has been under a cloud. As far as I'm concerned, the victim's husband is under a cloud of suspicion until we interrogate him.
See also: cloud

Caesar's wife must be above suspicion

If one is involved with a famous or prominent figure, one must avoid attracting negative attention or scrutiny. Julius Caesar allegedly used the phrase to explain why he divorced his wife, Pompeia. After my son's scandal derailed my presidential bid, I understood why Caesar's wife must be above suspicion.
See also: above, must, suspicion, wife

be above suspicion

To not be suspected of any wrongdoing or crime. Because everyone thought he was such a good citizen, he was above suspicion after the robbery.
See also: above, suspicion

be beyond suspicion

To not be suspected of any wrongdoing or crime. Because everyone thought he was such a good citizen, he was beyond suspicion after the robbery.
See also: beyond, suspicion

be under suspicion

To be viewed with distrust and/or thought to be dishonorable. Ever since that leak of private emails, everything the CEO has done has been under suspicion. As far as I'm concerned, the victim's husband is under suspicion until we interrogate him.
See also: suspicion

the finger of suspicion

The strongest suspicion of having done something wrong. Most often followed by "points at (someone or something)." The school is currently investigating the stolen equipment, and it seems like the finger of suspicion is currently pointed at the former science teacher. We must be careful not to place the finger of suspicion on anyone at this stage, as we don't have any facts or evidence yet.
See also: finger, of, suspicion

*above suspicion

[for one] to be honest enough that no one would suspect one; in a position where one could not be suspected. (This is a translation of words attributed to Julius Caesar, who divorced his wife, Pompeia, on the grounds of her possible involvement in a public scandal; Caesar stated, "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion.") (*Typically: be ~; keep oneself ~; remain ~.) The general is a fine old man, completely above suspicion.
See also: above, suspicion

Caesar's wife must be above suspicion.

Prov. The associates of public figures must not even be suspected of wrongdoing. (The ancient Roman Julius Caesar is supposed to have said this when asked why he divorced his wife, Pompeia. Because she was suspected of some wrongdoing, he could not associate with her anymore.) Jill: I don't think the mayor is trustworthy; his brother was charged with embezzlement. Jane: But the charges were never proved. Jill: That doesn't matter. Caesar's wife must be above suspicion. When the newspapers reported the rumor that the lieutenant governor had failed to pay his taxes, the governor forced him to resign, saying, "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion."
See also: above, must, suspicion, wife

above suspicion

So trustworthy as never to be suspected of wrongdoing, as in "The wife of Caesar must be above suspicion" (Charles Merivale, A History of the Romans under the Empire, 1850). The phrase was given further currency when it was used for the title of a very popular World War II spy film starring Joan Crawford ( Above Suspicion, 1943). A similar idiom using above in the sense of "beyond" is above the law, usually describing an individual or business behaving as though exempt from rules or laws that apply to others.
See also: above, suspicion

the ˌfinger of suˈspicion

if the finger of suspicion points or is pointed at somebody, they are suspected of having committed a crime, being responsible for something, etc: The woman’s still missing, and the finger of suspicion is now being pointed at her husband.
See also: finger, of, suspicion

be aˌbove/beˌyond suˈspicion

be so good or honest that nobody thinks you would do something bad: He is absolutely beyond suspicion.
See also: above, beyond, suspicion

be under suˈspicion (of something)

be the person that the police think has committed a crime (although they cannot prove it yet): He was still under suspicion and he knew the police were watching him.
See also: suspicion
References in classic literature ?
And that was just what confirmed my suspicion that it was not.
Monsieur Lawrence did not know at all what I meant; but, on reflection, he came to the conclusion that if he could find an extra coffee-cup anywhere his lady love would be cleared of suspicion.
Is there nothing to justify suspicion in such circumstances as these--circumstances sworn to on the oaths of the witnesses?
The League expressed concern the decision could place a chill on reporting because the decision limits the protection from civil liability for those who report suspicions of child abuse and neglect in good faith.
If a mandated reporter doesn't report such suspicions, the penalty is generally up to $1,000 or six months in jail.
6,'' said MPTF spokeswoman Christine Thomas, adding that fund officials contacted Burbank police about their suspicions.
Until this point, she had her suspicions her husband (Adrian Dunbar) and Rebecca (Claudia Harrison) had been having an affair.
Colyer, [33] an Amtrak drug enforcement unit investigator monitoring computerized reservations reported his suspicions to law enforcement in Washington, D.
Six weeks later, the same agent swore that his suspicions were aroused by a man because he "walked with intentional slowness after getting off the bus.
Before confronting Paula, though, the administrator wanted to interview Frankie to see if Frankie's suspicions were reasonable.
No basis for the suspicions of child abuse were found.
If we now examine the suspicions which have accumulated against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu,'' Rubinstein read from the official report at an evening news conference, ``our conclusion is that there is a tangible suspicion that he proposed that the Cabinet appoint attorney Bar-On to the position of attorney general, only .
What the law enforcement officer does during the detention to confirm or allay the officer's suspicions depends upon the facts of each particular detention.
The comments by Fernando Botero, a former defense minister, are a severe blow to Samper, who has been plagued by suspicions his campaign took millions of dollars from the world's largest supplier of cocaine.
Place aroused the suspicions of DEA agents in the Miami International Airport.