surge

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surge in(to something)

to burst or gush into something or some place. The water surged into the valley after the dam broke. The doors opened and the people surged in.
See also: surge

surge out (of something)

to burst forth or gush out of something or some place. The water surged out of the huge crack in the dam. We saw the crack where the water surged out.
See also: out, surge

surge up

to rush or gush upwards. A spring of fresh water surged up under the stone and flowed out on the ground. The oil surged up and blew out into the open air in a tall black column.
See also: surge, up
References in classic literature ?
It was unexpected youth, surging up anew after its temporary check, and bringing with it hope, and the invincible instinct towards self-delight.
We see but dimly through the mists that roll around our time-girt isle of life, and only hear the distant surging of the great sea beyond.
It was his little rock of safety in the midst of a surging ocean of West Australian sheep.
These old familiar sounds that are so distinctive of green Martian life sent a thrill of pleasure surging through me.
It was a rough, narrow trail, and led over an old lava flow--a black ocean which was tumbled into a thousand fantastic shapes--a wild chaos of ruin, desolation, and barrenness--a wilderness of billowy upheavals, of furious whirlpools, of miniature mountains rent asunder--of gnarled and knotted, wrinkled and twisted masses of blackness that mimicked branching roots, great vines, trunks of trees, all interlaced and mingled together: and all these weird shapes, all this turbulent panorama, all this stormy, far-stretching waste of blackness, with its thrilling suggestiveness of life, of action, of boiling, surging, furious motion, was petrified
To and fro swung the surging mass of struggling, stabbing humanity, but not for long.
Quasimodo then beheld distinctly surging in the Parvis a frightful herd of men and women in rags, armed with scythes, pikes, billhooks and partisans, whose thousand points glittered.
With his vivid fancy he seemed to see the surging throng round the pit-door of theatres, and the glitter of cheap restaurants, bars where men, half drunk, sat on high stools talking with barmaids; and under the street lamps the mysterious passing of dark crowds bent upon pleasure.