brain surgeon

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brain surgeon

Someone who is extremely intelligent and adept, usually used in a negative or rhetorical manner to indicate the opposite. You don't have to be a brain surgeon to use this device. Can I fix the computer? What do I look like, a brain surgeon?
See also: brain
References in classic literature ?
You have one thing to remember, ladies," said the surgeon.
In a pause of breathless silence--with the eyes of every person in the room eagerly fastened on him--the surgeon lifted his hand and pointed to Geoffrey Delamayn.
In the midst of the silence a sixth guest appeared on the lawn, and stepped into the library--a silent, resolute, unassuming, elderly man who had arrived the day before on a visit to Windygates, and who was well known, in and out of London, as one of the first consulting surgeons of his time.
Washington, Dec 01 (ANI): A new study has found that surgeons married to physicians face more challenges in balancing their personal and professional lives than do surgeons whose partners work in a non-physician field or stay at home.
Raymond Schaerf, a thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon who next month will be the first the medical center to perform a surgery using the machine on a cancer patient.
Rodrigo Araya, a cosmetic surgeon at Cima San Jose Hospital, a private clinic in the capital of Costa Rica, says combining surgery and vacation is not such an odd idea.
In more recent studies, early modem hospitals are seen as having had multiple functions, with a great variety of actors including lay and ecclesiastical nurses, administrators, apothecaries, surgeons, and patients all of whom helped to shape the institutions.
A new surgeon should visit other surgeons and observe them whenever possible.
The surgeon usually makes four small incisions between the patient's ribs.
But with a skilled and experienced surgeon, 95% to 98% of the time LASIK produces corrected distant vision of 20/40 or better.
Someday, a doctor in the United States may perform simple surgery on a wounded soldier in a distant land, says surgeon David W.
But as he passed the night sleeplessly, he reminded himself also that, had the patient been warned and fled to a "better" surgeon, he could still die--and then who would be blamed?
Surgeons frequently blame anesthesia for delays in initiating cases, for long turnaround time, and for wasting surgeon's time by not communicating on last-minute cancellations.
They had supportedKoop for surgeon general in 1981 over the fierce opposition of liberals, believing that his strong conservative views would guarantee a politically correct public health policy.
Surgical procedures are increasingly becoming oriented toward rendering both the patient and the surgeon free of any kind of discomfort or trauma with the aid of minimally invasive surgical concepts and emerging information technology, as well as networking solutions.