suppose


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

I suppose (so)

An expression of vague affirmation or assent. A: "It's starting to get dark out, should we start heading home?" B: "I suppose so." Bob: "You look a little down today. Everything alright?" Mary: "I suppose. I've just been feeling vaguely melancholy lately."
See also: suppose

I guess

 and I expect; I suppose; I suspect 
1. a phrase that introduces a supposition. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bob: I guess it's going to rain. Bill: Oh, I don't know. Maybe so, maybe not. Alice: I expect you'll be wanting to leave pretty soon. John: Why? It's early yet.
2. a vague way of answering 'yes'. John: You want some more coffee? Jane: I 'spose. Alice: Ready to go? John: I spect.
See also: guess

I guess not.

 and (I) don't think so.; I expect not.; I suppose not.; I suspect not.; I think not.
a vague statement of negation. (More polite or gentle than simply saying no. Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Bill: It's almost too late to go to the movie. Shall we try anyway? Mary: I guess not. Tom: Will it rain? Mary: I 'spect not.
See also: guess, not

I guess (so).

 and I believe so.; I expect (so).; I suppose (so).; I suspect (so).; I think so.
a vague expression of assent. (Frequently, in speech, suppose is reduced to 'spose, and expect and suspect are reduced to 'spect. The apostrophe is not always shown.) Tom: Will it rain today? Bob: I suppose so. Sue: Happy? Bill: I 'spect. Sue: You don't sound happy. Bill: I guess not.
See also: guess

Suppose I do?

 and Supposing I do?
Inf. And what does it matter if I do? What are you going to do about it? Alice: Do you really think it's right to do something like that? Sue: Suppose I do? Fred: Are you going to drive up into the mountains as you said you would? Sally: Supposing I do? Fred: I'm just asking.
See also: suppose

Suppose I don't?

 and Supposing I don't?
Inf. And what will happen if I don't? (Said as a sort of threat. Not usually with question intonation.) Bill: You'd better get yourself over to the main office. Tom: Suppose I don't? Father: You simply must do better in school. Tom: Supposing I don't? Father: Your clothing and personal belongings will be placed on the curb for the garbage pickup, and we will have the locks changed. Next question.
See also: suppose

I suppose so

I reluctantly agree, I guess so, as in Do you want tickets to the concert?-I suppose so, or Do you think it's going to rain?-I suppose so. [Mid-1500s]
See also: suppose
References in periodicals archive ?
But then I suppose if you left, and something happened, like you got to the All-Ireland, you'd be gutted.
In the original facts, suppose that one individual owns 100% of the shares of both A and B.
Or suppose that right now, in some Israeli development town, Kiryat Gat, let us say, or Karmiel, a young Russian boy, the son of recent immigrants, is sitting down--a magical moment
Suppose we had told them what we knew: Russia was indeed about to enter the war against them, and the time to surrender was now.
Well, I still live in harmony beside my neighbors in Matsudo, so I suppose they must still like me.
Cooperative Learning: Suppose a file is missing from CIA headquarters.
Suppose I'm a customer-support rep, and you phone in with a query.
Suppose, instead of shunning him, his fellow students cornered him in the student union to discuss Kant and Jesus and Buber and whether he has a little sister himself.
Most of us suppose, rather, that if the tape of history were replayed, we could have done otherwise in virtually all situations.
What do you suppose Ross Perot has in mind when he talks about holding town meetings via television if elected president?
SUPPOSE YOU'RE DEVISING a logo for a new wing of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, an office charged with developing intelligence tools and integrating the government's existing surveillance networks.
I suppose because there is not much to do there in he winter.
It's optimized for high speed--high transfer rates and fast data access, that is, hence, the "ac" root in the name, which, I suppose, they picked to suggest "acceleration," only without the extra "c.
Does Justice Shaw really suppose that by upholding Sharpe's right to conscience under the Charter he is acting in Sharpe's best interest, never mind the children he may exploit?
Suicide parlor doesn't have the right marketing ring, I suppose.