sup

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sup with Sir Thomas Gresham

To go without food. Sir Thomas Gresham founded the Royal Exchange in London, which the poor often visited. A: "Why are you so hungry? Didn't you eat dinner?" B: "No, I got stuck in a meeting, so I supped with Sir Thomas Gresham."
See also: sir, sup, Thomas

stick up

1. verb To stand or protrude upright. I always get this single hair that sticks up after I dry my hair.
2. verb To affix something to a high point on a vertical surface for it to be seen or displayed. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stick" and "up." My mom always sticks my good grades up on the fridge. It's a little embarrassing, but it also makes me feel good. The police are sticking up wanted posters of the criminal.
3. verb To raise and hold something aloft. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stick" and "up." Tom, don't stick your hand up if you don't have something worthwhile to say. The giraffe stuck its head up above the canopy of leaves.
4. verb To rob someone or something, especially at gunpoint. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stick" and "up." The criminal stuck me up in the back alley and stole all my money. He got sent to prison at 16 for sticking up drugstores and supermarkets.
5. noun A robbery, especially at gunpoint. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. That's the second stick-up at that gas station this month. Everybody on the ground, this is a stick-up!
See also: stick, up

stir up

1. To stir something with a tool or utensil, especially to mix together its ingredients or parts. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stir" and "up." He stirred the mixture up before pouring it out into the mold. Make sure to stir up the curry before you serve it.
2. To create as a result of stirring or agitating, or to cause to become churned or distributed in a chaotic way. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stir" and "up." Stop it, your stirring up a whole cloud of soot doing that! You're probably sneezing because the wind has been stirring up all the pollen.
3. To rouse, incite, or provoke something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stir" and "up." Quit stirring up trouble! The mayor has been stirring up controversy again with another inflammatory remark. The old movie stirred emotions up in me that I'd long forgotten.
4. To incense, agitate, or anger someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "stir" and "up." He's just attempting to stir up his followers and distract from the scandal. Nothing stirs my students up as much as when I assign homework over the weekend.
See also: stir, up

stock (someone or something) up (with something)

To furnish someone, something, or someplace with supplies (of something). We stocked the house up with food, so you should have plenty to eat while we're gone. The kitchen is running low on a few things, but Brady's coming round to stock us up tomorrow.
See also: stock, up

sup with the devil

To associate or deal with a particularly malicious, immoral, or unscrupulous person or people; to commit malicious, immoral, or unscrupulous acts. ("Sup" means to eat or have supper.) Primarily heard in UK. Once considered one of the most straight-laced politicians in England, it's come to light that the former Health Secretary has been supping with the devil for years, giving pharmaceutical companies special privileges in exchange for sizable kickbacks. She has been accused of supping with the devil after the activist was spotted having dinner with the CEO of one of the conglomerations her charity opposes.
See also: devil, sup

he who sups with the devil should have a long spoon

If associate or deal with a particularly malicious, immoral, or unscrupulous person or people, you should be prepared that they will try to deceive, exploit, or harm you. Primarily heard in UK. The prime minister has been bending over backwards to curry the favour of the despotic leader, presumably to try and negotiate a trade deal that will give Britain access to their huge oil reserves. But as the old saying goes, he who sups with the devil should have a long spoon.
See also: devil, have, he, long, should, spoon, sup, who

sup?

How have you been? What is or has been happening? (A colloquial shortening of "what's up?") A: "Sup Randy? I haven't seen you in a while." B: "Ah, not too much, just getting by, you know."

He who sups with the devil should have a long spoon.

Prov. If you have dealings with dangerous people, you must be careful that they do not harm you. If you're going to hang out with that disreputable bunch of people, keep in mind that he who sups with the devil should have a long spoon.
See also: devil, have, he, long, should, spoon, sup, who

stick someone or something up

to rob someone or a business establishment. (Presumably with the aid of a gun.) Max tried to stick the drugstore up. Max stuck up the store.
See also: stick, up

stick something up

 
1. to fasten something to a place where it can be seen; to put something on display, especially by gluing, tacking, or stapling. stick this notice up. Put a copy on every bulletin board. Please stick up this notice.
2. to raise something; to hold something up. she stuck her hand up because she knew the answer. The elephant stuck up its trunk and trumpeted.
See also: stick, up

stick up

to stand upright or on end; to thrust upward. The ugly red flower stuck up from the bouquet. Why is the worst-looking flower sticking up above all the rest?
See also: stick, up

stir someone up

Fig. to get someone excited; to get someone angry. (Fig. on stir something up.) The march music really stirred the audience up. The march stirred up the audience.
See also: stir, up

stir something up

 
1. Lit. to mix something by stirring. Please stir the pancake batter up before you use it. Please stir up the batter.
2. Fig. to cause trouble. Why are you always trying to stir trouble up? Are you stirring up trouble again?
See also: stir, up

stick up

1. Project from a surface, as in That little cowlick of his sticks up no matter what you do. [Early 1400s]
2. Put up a poster or notice, as in Will you stick up this announcement on the bulletin board? [Late 1700s]
3. Rob, especially at gunpoint, as in The gang concentrated on sticking up liquor stores and gas stations. This usage, dating from the mid-1800s, gave rise to the colloquial phrase, stick 'em up, a robber's order to a victim to raise his or her hands above the head. [1930s]
See also: stick, up

stir up

1. Mix together the ingredients or parts, as in He stirred up some pancake batter, or Will you stir up the fire? [Mid-1300s]
2. Rouse to action, incite, provoke, as in He's always stirring up trouble among the campers, or If the strikers aren't careful they'll stir up a riot. [First half of 1500s] Also see stir up a hornets' nest.
See also: stir, up

sup (or dine) with the devil

have dealings with a cunning or malevolent person.
The proverb he who sups with the devil should have a long spoon is used especially to urge someone dealing with a person of this type to take care.
See also: devil, sup

stick up

v.
1. To project or protrude upwards: When I woke up this morning my hair was sticking up.
2. To cause something to project or protrude upwards: The mayor stuck up her hands and waved to the crowd. Stick 'em up—this is a robbery!
3. To rob someone or something, especially at gunpoint: A robber stuck up the bank and stole thousands of dollars. Two people with shotguns walked into the store and stuck it up.
4. To post something with or as if with an adhesive: They stuck up posters all around the neighborhood. I stuck the photos up on my website.
5. stick up for To defend or support someone or something: I stuck up for my little brother whenever the other kids teased him. You should stick up for yourself and not let people spread rumors about you.
See also: stick, up

stir up

v.
1. To mix something before cooking or use: You must stir up the concrete thoroughly before you start paving the path. I poured the batter into a bowl and stirred it up vigorously.
2. To churn or agitate something into a state of turbulence: The storm stirred up the normally placid lake. The wind stirs the leaves up.
3. To cause something to form by churning or agitating: The truck zoomed off, stirring a cloud of dust up behind it. I stirred up a batch of concrete in the mixer and got to work paving the driveway.
4. To rouse the emotions of someone or something; excite someone or something: The protesters hope to stir up the public through this demonstration. The teacher stirred the students up when she threatened to give them more work.
5. To summon some collective emotion or sentiment by exciting a group of people: The court's verdict was certain to stir up controversy. The tourism board is trying to stir up interest in the city.
6. To evoke some mental image or remembrance: That old picture stirs up many memories for me.
See also: stir, up

(T)sup?

(ˈ(t)səp)
interrog. What’s up?; What is happening?; What have you been doing? Hi! Tsup?

sup?

verb
See Tsup?