sun

(redirected from sunned)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

think the sun shines out (someone's) backside

To believe a person is better or more important than others or above reproach. (Note: If thought about oneself, it means that he or she is arrogant, conceited, or self-absorbed. If someone thinks this of another person, it means that he or she loves or admires that person to such a degree as to be blind to any of their potential faults.) Tom has acted like he's such a hotshot after getting the promotion. He thinks the sun shines out his backside! He's absolutely head-over-heels in love with Mary. Even though I find her a bit irritating, he thinks the sun shines out her backside.
See also: backside, out, shine, sun, think

as if the sun shines out (someone's) backside

As though someone or oneself is better or more important than others. Various slang and vulgar synonyms for "backside" are often substituted. (Note: If thought about oneself, it means that he or she is arrogant, conceited, or self-absorbed. If someone thinks this of another person, it means that he or she loves or admires that person to such a degree as to be blinded to any of their potential faults.) Samantha has such an ego and acts as if the sun shines out her backside. He's absolutely head-over-heels in love with Mary. Even though I find her a bit irritating, to him it's as if the sun shines out her backside.
See also: backside, if, out, shine, sun

(one's) moment in the sun

A brief period of time in which one is or has been particularly successful, popular, famous, etc., especially when set against an otherwise moderate or unremarkable life. After 35 years in this one-horse town, all I want is a moment in the sun, a time when the whole world knows and loves me! Jonathan had his moment in the sun when one of his videos went viral on the Internet and, for a little while at least, he became a household name.
See also: moment, sun

catch the sun

To get sunburned. I caught the sun at the beach last weekend, and now my back hurts so much that I have to sleep on my side! I made sure to pack you some extra sunscreen so that you don't catch the sun on your trip.
See also: catch, sun

have the sun in (one's) eyes

1. To be unable to see because the sun is shining directly into one's eyes. I have the sun in my eyes—can you read that sign? My mom hates having the sun in her eyes, so she keeps her sunglasses with her at all times.
2. To be drunk. The phrase might refer to the unsteady gait of one who is drunk (likened to one who is blinded by the sun). A: "Don't mind him, he just has the sun in his eyes." B: "Seriously? How is he drunk already?"
See also: eye, have, sun

never let the sun go down on your anger

Always make amends before the day is done; do not go to sleep angry. I know you're mad at him right now, but you should never let the sun go down on your anger.
See also: anger, down, let, never, on, sun

everything but the kitchen sink

Cliché almost everything one can think of. When Sally went off to college, she took everything but the kitchen sink. John orders everything but the kitchen sink when he goes out to dinner, especially if someone else is paying for it.
See also: but, everything, kitchen, sink

go to bed with the sun

Fig. to go to bed early, at sunset. The campers went to bed with the sun. The children had to go to bed with the sun. The grown-ups stayed up a little later.
See also: bed, sun

Happy is the bride that the sun shines on.

Prov. It is supposed to be good luck for the sun to shine on a couple on their wedding day. Our wedding day was a sunny one, and most of my relatives made sure to remind me, "Happy is the bride that the sun shines on."
See also: bride, happy, on, shine, sun

head for someone or something

to aim for or move toward someone or something. She waved good-bye as she headed for the door. Ann came in and headed for her mother.
See also: head

Make hay while the sun shines.

Prov. If you have an opportunity to do something, do it before the opportunity expires. Jane: While my husband's out of town, I'm going to watch all the movies he wouldn't take me to see. Jane: Why not? Make hay while the sun shines.
See also: hay, make, shine, sun

the sun belt

Fig. the southern U.S. states, where it is generally warm and sunny. I want to retire to the sun belt. The population of the sun belt is exploding.
See also: belt, sun

There is nothing new under the sun.

Prov. Everything that is happening now has happened before. (Biblical.) Jill: The newspaper today is shocking. Three prominent politicians have been convicted of fraud. Jane: That's not shocking. It only proves that there's nothing new under the sun.
See also: new, nothing, sun

think the sun rises and sets on someone

Fig. to think someone is the most important person in the world. Her daddy just thinks the sun rises and sets on her. She worships that boyfriend of hers. She thinks the sun rises and sets on him.
See also: and, on, rise, set, sun, think

under the sun

Fig. anywhere on earth at all. This is the largest cattle ranch under the sun. Isn't there anyone under the sun who can help me with this problem?
See also: sun

where the sun don't shine

Sl. in a dark place, namely the anus. I don't care what you do with it. Just put it where the sun don't shine. For all I care you can shove it where the sun don't shine.
See also: shine, sun

everything but the kitchen sink

almost all that you can imagine of something Here's a website that simply has everything but the kitchen sink.
Etymology: based on the idea that if you brought many things to someone, a kitchen sink is one of the last things you would bring because it is difficult to move
See also: but, everything, kitchen, sink

everything under the sun

everything that exists or that you can imagine We talked about everything under the sun.
Usage notes: often every something under the sun: She seems to have an opinion on every subject under the sun.
See also: everything, sun

make hay while the sun shines

to do something while the situation or conditions are right I've got a few hours to finish the housework before the kids come home so I might as well make hay while the sun shines.
See hit the sack
See also: hay, make, shine, sun

everything but the kitchen sink

  (humorous)
a lot of different things, many of which you do not need We were only going away for the weekend, but Jack insisted on taking everything but the kitchen sink.
See also: but, everything, kitchen, sink

a/somebody's place in the sun

a job or situation that makes you happy and that provides you with all the money and things that you want After struggling for years to make a name for himself, he's certainly earned his place in the sun.
See also: place, sun

think the sun shines out (of) somebody's arse/backside

  (British & Australian very informal)
to love or admire someone so much that you do not think they have any faults You're never going to hear Maggie criticizing Jim - she thinks the sun shines out his backside!
See also: arse, out, shine, sun, think

under the sun

everything under the sun is everything that exists or is possible We talked about everything under the sun. She seems to have an opinion on every subject under the sun.
See also: sun

everything but the kitchen sink

Also, everything under the sun. Including just about everything, whether appropriate or not. For example, Our new car has every feature-everything but the kitchen sink. This hyperbolic term may date from the early 1900s but only became widespread in the mid-1900s. The variant employs under the sun in the sense of "everything on earth," a usage dating from about a.d. 1000.
See also: but, everything, kitchen, sink

head for

Proceed or go in a certain direction, as in I'm heading for town, or I believe Karen and Jane are heading for a big quarrel. This expression, which uses head in the sense of "advance toward," is occasionally amplified with a figurative destination, especially in the American West. For example, head for the hills means "to run away to high and safer ground" or "to flee from danger." It is often used facetiously, as in Here comes that old bore-head for the hills!Head for the setting sun alludes to where a wanted man or outlaw went when a law-enforcement agent was close behind him, that is, farther west, and head for the last roundup means "to die." [Early 1800s]
See also: head

make hay while the sun shines

Take advantage of favorable circumstances, as in Car sales have finally improved so we're making hay while the sun shines. This expression alludes to optimum dry weather for cutting grass. [Early 1500s]
See also: hay, make, shine, sun

nothing new under the sun

Everything has been seen before, as in Those designs take me back to the 1950s-there really is nothing new under the sun. This world-weary view was already expressed in 1382 in the Bible translation attributed to John Wycliffe's followers: "No thing under the sun is new" (Ecclesiastes 1:9).
See also: new, nothing, sun

place in the sun

A dominant or favorable position or situation, as in The Nobel prizewinners really enjoyed their place in the sun. This term may have been coined about 1660 by the French philosopher Blaise Pascal but became well known only in the late 1800s, when it was applied to Germany's position in world affairs, especially concerning its desire for more lands.
See also: place, sun

sun belt

The southern and southwestern United States, as in Retirees have been moving to the sun belt for years. It is so called for its warm climate. [Mid-1900s]
See also: belt, sun

under the sun

See also: sun

head for

v.
1. To travel toward some destination: We headed for Houston.
2. To set something or someone on a course toward some destination, situation or condition. Used passively: This bus is headed for New York. You're headed for trouble if you keep telling such lies.
See also: head

everything but the kitchen sink

verb
See also: but, everything, kitchen, sink

sun belt

n. the southern U.S. states, where it is generally warm and sunny. (see also rust belt.) I want to retire to the sun belt.
See also: belt, sun

where the sun don’t shine

in. in a dark place, namely the anus. (Often with put it or shove it. Part of the answer to the question Where shall I put it? Always with don’t; never with doesn’t.) For all I care you can shove it where the sun don’t shine.
See also: shine, sun

place in the sun

A dominant or favorable position or situation.
See also: place, sun

in the sun

In the public eye.
See also: sun

under the sun

On the earth; in the world.
See also: sun