sugar

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Related to sugars: complex sugars, Simple sugars

sugar-coat the pill

To make something bad, unpleasant, or dissatisfactory easier to cope with, endure, or accept. The bosses are giving everyone an extra 10% bonus this Christmas, but I suspect it's a way of sugar-coating the pill that there will be massive pay cuts in January. I have to tell my mom about wrecking her car, but I need to find a way to sugar-coat the pill first.
See also: pill

a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down

Something good makes something bad more tolerable. I'm going to put on some fun background music while I work on this boring project because a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.
See also: down, help, medicine, of, sugar

give someone some sugar

Rur. to give someone a kiss. Come here, honey, and give me some sugar. "Give me some sugar!" Grandma said when she saw me.
See also: give, sugar

*sweet as honey

 and sweeter than honey; sweet as sugar
very sweet; charming. (*Also: as ~.) Larry's words were sweeter than honey as he tried to convince Alice to forgive him. Jill: Is Mary Ann nice? Jane: Yes, indeed. She's as sweet as honey. Your little girl is darling! Just as sweet as sugar.
See also: honey, sweet

sugar/sweeten the pill

  (British, American & Australian) also sugar-coat the pill (American)
to make something bad seem less unpleasant The government have cut income tax to sweeten the pill of a tough budget.
See also: pill, sugar

Uncle Sam

the government or the country of the United States These smaller countries resent being so dependent on Uncle Sam for protection.
See say uncle
See also: SAM, uncle

sugar daddy

A wealthy, usually older man who gives expensive gifts to someone much younger in return for companionship or sexual favors. For example, The aspiring young actress and the sugar daddy are a classic combination in Hollywood. The sugar in this term alludes to the sweetening role of the gifts, and daddy to the age difference between the pair. [Early 1900s]
See also: daddy, sugar

sugar the pill

Make something unpleasant more palatable, as in There would be no Christmas bonus this year but management sugared the pill by giving workers extra vacation time over the holidays . [Late 1700s]
See also: pill, sugar

sugar off

v.
To make maple syrup or maple sugar by boiling maple sap: The farmer had gathered all the sap, and it was now time to sugar off.
See also: off, sugar

sugar daddy

n. an older man who takes care of a younger person, especially a young man or woman. Mr. Wilson is sort of a sugar daddy to the whole team.
See also: daddy, sugar

Uncle (Sam)

and Uncle Sugar
1. n. the personification of the U.S. Uncle Sugar wants a little more of your money this year.
2. n. a federal agent; federal agents. Uncle has some pretty strong ideas about who’s in charge of this investigation.
See also: SAM, uncle

Uncle Sugar

verb
See also: sugar, uncle
References in classic literature ?
When this important point shall be achieved, it will be in season to turn our attention to an improvement in the manufacture of the article, But thou knowest, Richard, that I have already subjected our sugar to the process of the refiner, and that the result has produced loaves as white as the snow on yon fields, and possessing the saccharine quality in its utmost purity.
I would build a sugar house in the village; I would invite learned men to an investigation of the subject—and such are easily to be found, sir; yes, sir, they are not difficult to find—men who unite theory with practice; and I would select a wood of young and thrifty trees; and, instead of making loaves of the size of a lump of candy, dam’me, ‘Duke, but I’d have them as big as a haycock.
It's not good sugar, either--it's coarse and dark--William Blair doesn't usually keep sugar like that.
You shut your eyes to that awkward fact, and swallow your adulterated mess in various articles of food; and you and your sugar get on together in that way as well as you can.
Meantime, Hargrave volunteered to ring for the sugar, while Grimsby lamented his mistake, and attempted to prove that it was owing to the shadow of the urn and the badness of the lights.
When that official hurried up, fuzzy-haired and somewhat blear-eyed at that early hour, the detective (who was not without an appreciation of the simpler forms of humour) asked him to taste the sugar and see if it was up to the high reputation of the hotel.
No sugar," said Cynthia, watching him, as he picked up the sugar-tongs.
Pinocchio eats sugar, but refuses to take medicine.
Swishtail's academy upon what are called "mutual principles"--that is to say, the expenses of his board and schooling were defrayed by his father in goods, not money; and he stood there--most at the bottom of the school--in his scraggy corduroys and jacket, through the seams of which his great big bones were bursting--as the representative of so many pounds of tea, candles, sugar, mottled-soap, plums (of which a very mild proportion was supplied for the puddings of the establishment), and other commodities.
Come, let's go up," said Anna, as she gave her favorite horse the sugar the footman had brought her.
The sturdy children that ran out upon the street between meals with huge slices of bread and butter and sugar now came out with no sugar and with thinner slices spread more thinly with butter.
The cold water with pleasure, a spoon, and the basin of sugar.
There was literally nothing else in the station but rice and coffee; they drank the coffee without sugar.
tobacco in roll, and sugar in chests, besides rum, molasses, &c.
The last glass of wine we had I drank, and put sugar in it, because of its having some spirit to supply nourishment; but there being no substance in the stomach for the digesting office to work upon, I found the only effect of the wine was to raise disagreeable fumes from the stomach into the head; and I lay, as they told me, stupid and senseless, as one drunk, for some time.