suffice

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Related to sufficed: thesaurus, surfaced

suffice for someone or something

to be sufficient for someone or something. This serving will suffice for me. Did you get enough? Will this suffice for you?
See also: suffice

suffice it to say

It is enough to say this and no more, as in Suffice it to say that the judge was furious when the invitation was withdrawn. [Late 1600s]
See also: say, suffice
References in classic literature ?
All during the interview Carthoris watched, catlike, for some indication that Vas Kor recognized in the battered panthan the erstwhile gorgeous Prince of Helium; but the sleepless nights, the long days of marching and fighting, the wounds and the dried blood had evidently sufficed to obliterate the last remnant of his likeness to his former self; and then Vas Kor had seen him but twice in all his life.
However slight it might have been, it had sufficed to modify the course of the projectile.
She then betook herself to the business of packing, for which a small quantity of brown paper sufficed, and, having received her small pittance of wages, she returned home.
We lived so simply and quietly that the income which I was now steadily earning sufficed for all our wants.
And a minibus rather than the full-size one might have sufficed.
And if stopping snacking on a public bus is the goal, a simple warning would have sufficed.
We never get to know Ezra or Elizabeth, however, and I'm not quite sure why Cadnum needed these characters to kick off the plot--the danger of the trip and Will's adventures would have sufficed.
In support of its conclusion that the sale qualified as an involuntary conversion, the Service stated that the threat or imminence of Conversion or both by the government sufficed for Sec.
All five dancers performed with elegance, amplitude and little weight or edge; it was both flat and mystifying to the audience, which was equally flummoxed by Guerin's Bessie Award--winning--Two Lies, a work that makes a statement about the condition of women in a long paragraph--twenty-five minutes--when three sentences would have sufficed.
Too often the reader is taken on lengthy tangential forays when a paragraph would have sufficed.