suction

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suck

1. and suction n. liquor; wine; beer; strong drink. How about a little glass of suck before we leave?
2. and suck something up tv. to drink beer or liquor. Yeah, I’ll suck one up with ya.
3. in. [for someone or something] to be bad or undesirable. This movie sucks!
4. and suction n. influence. He thinks he has suck, but he’s just a pain in the neck.

suction

verb
See suck
References in periodicals archive ?
When the dentist is working on the lingual surfaces of the mandibular anteriors, the assistant generally positions the HVE suction tip facial and occlusal to the mandibular anterior teeth, and uses a flat surface to retract the lower anterior lip, while the HVE shaft protrudes extra-orally towards the patient's left lateral side.
To suction debris under the posterior aspect of the tongue in the lingual vestibule, the dentist can use a mouth mirror to lift up the tongue at the posterior aspect so as to squirt water under the tongue to float up debris for suctioning using the HVE suction tip.
Positioning the shaft so that it protrudes superiorly and anteriorly, versus just anteriorly in front of the patient's mouth, can also facilitate access of the HVE suction tip to the corner of the patient's mouth.
Concentrating the suction power of the chairside HVE suction
After every procedure, the assistant should suction water into the suction for 15-20 seconds to prevent debris from adhering to the internal suction piping.
5 kPa suction was due to drainage through pores [is less than or equal to] 600 [micro]m diameter.
The infiltrometer was then replaced and set to 0 kPa water suction.
5 kPa suction whilst at 0 kPa it was only 2 weeks (Table 1).
The greater volume of cumulative drainage under 0 kPa suction was because of the extended leaching period required to produce a complete bromide BTC.
However at 0 kPa suction the concentration of urea-N reached a maximum of 16 mg/L (Fig.