subject

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on a (subject or activity) kick

Experiencing a particularly intense and constant enthusiasm for some subject or activity. Jim's been on a real cycling kick ever since he bought that new bike. I'm on a bit of a politics kick at the moment, but I reckon it will die down once the election season is over.
See also: kick, on

change the subject

to begin talking about something different. They changed the subject suddenly when the person whom they had been discussing entered the room. We'll change the subject if we are embarrassing you.
See also: change, subject

Drop the subject!

 and Drop it!
Fig. Do not discuss it further! Bill: Sally, you're gaining a little weight. I thought you were on a diet. Sally: That's enough! Drop the subject! Bill: That house is a mess. I wonder who lives there. Mary: That's my aunt's house. Just what did you want to know about it? Bill: Oh, drop it! Sorry I asked.
See also: drop

off the subject

not concerned with the subject being discussed. I got off the subject and forgot what I was supposed to be talking about. The speaker was off the subject, telling about his vacation in Hawaii.
See also: off, subject

subject someone or something to something

to cause someone to endure someone or something. I didn't mean to subject you to Uncle Harry. I am sorry I have to subject you to all this questioning.
See also: subject

subject to something

likely to have something, such as a physical disorder, The sick man was subject to dizzy spells. I am subject to frequent headaches.
See also: subject

subject somebody/something to something

to cause someone or something to experience something How do you feel about subjecting people to random drug testing? My daughter's only three, but I've already subjected her to all sorts of music, from bebop to hip-hop.
Usage notes: often said about experiencing something unpleasant: The company's accounts were subjected to close investigation.
See also: subject

change the subject

Deliberately talk about another topic, as in If someone asks you an embarrassing question, just change the subject. This term uses subject in the sense of "a topic of conversation," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: change, subject

subject to, be

1. Be under the control or authority of, as in All citizens in this nation are subject to the law. [First half of 1300s]
2. Be prone or disposed to, as in This child has always been subject to colds. [Late 1300s]
3. Be likely to incur or receive, as in This memo is subject to misinterpretation. [Late 1300s]
4. Depend on, be likely to be affected by, as in Our vacation plans are subject to the boss's whims. [Early 1800s]
See also: subject

subject to

v.
To cause someone to undergo or experience something: The commander subjected the troops to daily inspections. The oil platform was subjected to extreme weather.
See also: subject
References in periodicals archive ?
Accordingly, any study involving the administration of a pesticide to a human subject must he designed to minimize harm while subjecting the participant to no unreasonable risk.
To minimize harm to humans and to avoid subjecting humans to unreasonable risks, it is necessary to begin studies by testing pesticides in animals.
In addition to the Montgomery Ward case, the court cited Scripto in support of subjecting the parent corporation to Illinois tax.
87)The standards for subjecting foreign entities to tax jurisdiction may differ from those applicable to in personam jurisdiction in a given case.