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Related to subject: Subject and object

on a (subject or activity) kick

Experiencing a particularly intense and constant enthusiasm for some subject or activity. Jim's been on a real cycling kick ever since he bought that new bike. I'm on a bit of a politics kick at the moment, but I reckon it will die down once the election season is over.
See also: kick

change the subject

to begin talking about something different. They changed the subject suddenly when the person whom they had been discussing entered the room. We'll change the subject if we are embarrassing you.
See also: change, subject

Drop the subject!

 and Drop it!
Fig. Do not discuss it further! Bill: Sally, you're gaining a little weight. I thought you were on a diet. Sally: That's enough! Drop the subject! Bill: That house is a mess. I wonder who lives there. Mary: That's my aunt's house. Just what did you want to know about it? Bill: Oh, drop it! Sorry I asked.
See also: drop

off the subject

not concerned with the subject being discussed. I got off the subject and forgot what I was supposed to be talking about. The speaker was off the subject, telling about his vacation in Hawaii.
See also: off, subject

subject someone or something to something

to cause someone to endure someone or something. I didn't mean to subject you to Uncle Harry. I am sorry I have to subject you to all this questioning.
See also: subject

subject to something

likely to have something, such as a physical disorder, The sick man was subject to dizzy spells. I am subject to frequent headaches.
See also: subject

subject somebody/something to something

to cause someone or something to experience something How do you feel about subjecting people to random drug testing? My daughter's only three, but I've already subjected her to all sorts of music, from bebop to hip-hop.
Usage notes: often said about experiencing something unpleasant: The company's accounts were subjected to close investigation.
See also: subject

change the subject

Deliberately talk about another topic, as in If someone asks you an embarrassing question, just change the subject. This term uses subject in the sense of "a topic of conversation," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: change, subject

subject to, be

1. Be under the control or authority of, as in All citizens in this nation are subject to the law. [First half of 1300s]
2. Be prone or disposed to, as in This child has always been subject to colds. [Late 1300s]
3. Be likely to incur or receive, as in This memo is subject to misinterpretation. [Late 1300s]
4. Depend on, be likely to be affected by, as in Our vacation plans are subject to the boss's whims. [Early 1800s]
See also: subject

subject to

To cause someone to undergo or experience something: The commander subjected the troops to daily inspections. The oil platform was subjected to extreme weather.
See also: subject
References in classic literature ?
It may often happen on the stage, that an actor, by possessing in a preeminent degree the external qualities necessary to give effect to comedy, may be deprived of the right to aspire to tragic excellence; and in painting or literary composition, an artist or poet may be master exclusively of modes of thought, and powers of expression, which confine him to a single course of subjects.
Whether this reasoning be correct or otherwise, the present author felt, that, in confining himself to subjects purely Scottish, he was not only likely to weary out the indulgence of his readers, but also greatly to limit his own power of affording them pleasure.
I will; and first tell me, Do you admit that it is just or subjects to obey their rulers?
And the laws which they make must be obeyed by their subjects,-- and that is what you call justice?
Levin, though he did not belong to the university, had several times already during his stay in Moscow heard and talked about this matter, and had his own opinion on the subject.
As soon as Miss Fairlie had left the room he spared us all embarrassment on the subject of the anonymous letter, by adverting to it of his own accord.
My opinion is that he did, seeing that he pointedly resumed the subject, although he might now, with all propriety, have allowed it to drop.
Both the typhoon and Captain MacWhirr presented themselves to me as the necessities of the deep conviction with which I approached the subject of the story.
As he is presented as sensitive enough to be affected permanently by a certain unusual experience, that experience had to be set by me before the reader vividly; but it is not the subject of the tale.
Mr Doyce mentioned incidentally, in the course of our conversation, that he was going to take your valuable advice on the subject of finding such a partner.
And I shall be glad to enter into the subject, provided Mr Doyce responds, and you think well of it.
And have you no means of checking frauds of this kind by commanding your neighbouring subjects to feel one another?
But come, suppose that I had the power of passing through solid things, so that I could penetrate my subjects, one after another, even to the number of a billion, verifying the size and distance of each by the sense of FEELING: how much time and energy would be wasted in this clumsy and inaccurate method
And whoever should reply: If the people have property outside the city, and see it burnt, they will not remain patient, and the long siege and self- interest will make them forget their prince; to this I answer that a powerful and courageous prince will overcome all such difficulties by giving at one time hope to his subjects that the evil will not be for long, at another time fear of the cruelty of the enemy, then preserving himself adroitly from those subjects who seem to him to be too bold.
In Ionia and the islands the epic poets followed the Homeric tradition, singing of romantic subjects in the now stereotyped heroic style, and showing originality only in their choice of legends hitherto neglected or summarily and imperfectly treated.