stymie

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stymie

(ˈstɑɪmi)
tv. to obstruct someone or something. He did everything he could to stymie the investigation.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the central bank of Italy, growth in the nation has been stymied by the credit crunch.
In recent years financial difficulties have stymied its construction.
Presently, negotiations are stymied by the IRA's reluctance to disarm completely and by the Sinn Fein party's distrust of the police force (Toronto Star, April 18/03).
Shakespeare's Hamlet, feeling pulled in many directions and stymied about what to do, decides with these famous words to leave his situation up to fate and be prepared for anything.
As long as campaign finance continues to be stymied, primarily by the GOP, the environmental movement needs to play the money game.
If the Emancipation Proclamation, a political ploy used by President Lincoln to disrupt the economy of the South during the Civil War, promised a temporary respite from slavery for some blacks, it was quickly stymied by his successor, President Andrew Johnson, who betrayed the newly freed slaves to curry favor with white Southerners to consolidate his power.
Opposition congresses in Mexico and Chile have stymied changes across the board.
ARMA filed claim for the losses with the insurance company, only to be stymied in the claims review process.
UN negotiators are trying to hammer out the document, titled "A World Fit for Children," but have been stymied by an ongoing disagreement over references to abortion.
Over the past several years, legislators hoping to repeal the state's sodomy law were stymied by conservative politicians who controlled both the house and senate.
If you find yourself stymied in your current position, consider leaving the organization.
But, as many historians before Gump have pointed out, a combination of white greed and Indian cultural resistance stymied the assimilationist project.
Clearly spellbound by Rousseau's work, Sappington is also stymied by it, unable to do it justice.
This jewel belongs to Elizabeth I and Sarah is stymied as to how stealthily to return it.