stymie


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stymie

(ˈstɑɪmi)
tv. to obstruct someone or something. He did everything he could to stymie the investigation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysts in Indonesia are of the view that new insurance laws will not stymie growth of M&As in the nation.
Also, the cameras might easily stymie passengers who aren't security risks; think customs or immigration.
At least one constitutional law scholar doubted that Hollywood -- the defendant -- would be able to stymie Hollywood -- the industry -- from telling his story.
Numerous studies have shown that many kinds of cancer cells overproduce this caspase inhibitor, apparently to stymie the cellular-suicide program called apoptosis.
Epidemics such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and mad cow disease make headlines around the world and stymie epidemiologists and physicians.
One example is Bloomberg's ability to streamline the approval and permitting process at the Building Department, which continues to stymie development with costly delays.
The Army Corps showed further signs of trying to stymie research by dumping dirt and rocks on the site where Kennewick Man was found.
The decision could help stymie future attempts to control speech in the name of day-to-day business regulation.
Innocent-looking problems involving whole numbers can stymie even the most astute mathematicians.