professional student

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professional student

1. Someone in the process of earning a "professional degree"—one in a field like medicine, law, or education, for instance. We have a stellar group of professional students joining our program this year.
2. slang One who continues to pursue education instead of employment. I'm starting to worry that my son just wants to be a professional student forever and will never get a job.
See also: professional
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, formative assessments, or those performed throughout the school year, keep track of student achievement and weaknesses.
Monitor, accurately report and push for reduced dropout rates by gathering accurate data for key student groups like ethnic and racial groups, establishing benchmarks in each state, and adopting standardized reporting developed by the National Governors Association.
To measure students' perceptions of goal-setting and self-regulated learning, one fourth grade classroom consisting of 21 students (14 girls and 7 boys) who participated in their first goal-setting process and student-led goal-setting conference were chosen for this study.
The Student Goal Survey (SGS): a 14-item Likert-type instrument designed to measure students' perceptions of the student-led conference and their attitudes toward goals developed by teachers and themselves.
Story outlines and student storytelling: Students learn strategies to make understanding and remembering stories easier.
This includes counselor efforts tied to improved student outcomes (ASCA, 2004).
CRM is allowing us to fully engage students," says Jerry Harrell, director of student support and advising.
While many of the systems they reviewed focused on academic aspects, such as what courses a student has taken and what they still need, their system "addresses the relationship with the student," she says.
Galagher, John and Keller (1992) and Nicholas (1995, 1997, 2002) noted that student needs are high and surveys on students' needs have multiple benefits.
I arrived in Tehran the first week of July, hoping to catch the student movement in full stride.
Suddenly, college enrollment was a contract between the student and the school.
For example, a very bright math student could get the wrong answers to complex math problems because he cannot read his own writing.
First, teacher and student plan the passage, including the fingering to be used.
These kinds of student behaviors may not come naturally; mentors and proteges alike need guidance to establish mentoring expectations (Burlew, 1991; Gaskill, 1993; Schwiebert, Deck, Bradshaw, Scott, & Harper, 1999).
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